Last updated: October 29. 2013 5:28PM - 808 Views
By - wbyerly-wood@civitasmedia.com - 3368351513



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It’s the one day of the year — sometimes a couple of days a week with most parties held on the weekend prior to — that adults can play dress up just as much as kids do and people don’t think they’ve lost their minds.


Halloween, it’s here again this year, as it is each year.


The day is one of my favorites of the year. And while I may not go all out on the costumes quite as much as I did as a child up through my college and young adult years, now that I have a toddler of my own, my fun is had watching him dress up and have fun trick-or-treating with the other kids around town.


Last year was Little Man’s first real year knowing what Halloween was and really being able to enjoy it. We did take him trick-or-treating his first Halloween, as he was just two days short of being 1 that year, but most of the candy was not baby friendly and he wasn’t talking much yet.


As a child just a couple of days from being 2, my little raccoon was excited and ready to go. He was still a little bashful — but only the first 10 or 15 minutes he’s around someone — so the trick-or-treats were quiet.


On Thursday though, I’m looking forward to a cowboy who has been practicing “Yee-haw” and “trick-or-treat” in preparation for the big day.


We will hit the streets ready to go, visiting a few businesses early, then the homes of family and close friends afterward.


As children around the area are escorted by their parents — either on foot or by car — I encourage people traveling to keep an eye out for little ghosts, goblins and witches who don’t have working flying brooms or haven’t mastered the haunting float and instead dart into traffic, forgetting in the excitement of the moment to look both ways.


For those little ones who can’t wait to get that next piece of candy or other goody, remember to stay in groups or with parents, carry a flashlight, take your mask off to cross the street so it isn’t hindering your view of possible traffic and wear reflective tape on your shoes or other places on your costume to make you more visible.


Also, please remember that while most people love to offer treats for the youngsters, some people choose not to participate because they may not be able to afford it or their beliefs do not support it, so only visit homes with their porch lights on — the universal sign welcoming little monsters, devils and characters to come asking for goodies.


Have a happy, and safe, Halloween!


And while you’re at it, take a picture of those great costumes and enter them in the Elkin Tribune and Yadkin Ripple Virtual Costume Contest at elkintribune.com or yadkinripple.com.


Wendy Byerly Wood is the content manager for The Elkin Tribune and The Yadkin Ripple and editor of The Pilot. She can be reached at wbyerly-wood@civitasmedia.com or at 835-1513.

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