Seven graduate from Surry’s Electronics Engineering Program


Staff Report



Students enrolled in Surry Community College’s Electronics Engineering Technology program each work on a unique project demonstrating the skills they learn in class. Pictured is recent graduate Jordan Easter’s project – a Nixie tube clock using display tubes from the 1970s to show the time. Since graduating, Easter, of Ararat, Virginia, has begun working full time at Dorsett Technologies in Yadkinville.


Submitted photo

Seven students recently graduated from Surry Community College with an associate degree from the Electronics Engineering Technology program. They are, from left, Computer and Electronics Engineering Technologies Division Chair Dr. Clayton Workman, Jordan O’Neal of Ararat, Jacob Galyean of Mount Airy, Samuel Harris of Dobson, Carolyn Shockley of Tobaccoville, Jordan Easter of Ararat, Virginia, Benjamen Underwood of Yadkinville, and Luis Garin of Elkin.


Submitted photo

DOBSON — Seven students recently graduated from Surry Community College with an associate degree from the Electronics Engineering Technology (EET) program.

The graduates were Jordan Easter of Ararat, Virginia, Jacob Galyean of Mount Airy, Luis Garin of Elkin, Samuel Harris of Dobson, Jordan O’Neal of Ararat, Carolyn Shockley of Tobaccoville and Benjamen Underwood of Yadkinville.

SCC’s Electronics Engineering Technology program prepares students to apply basic engineering principles and technical skills to become technicians who design, build, install, test, troubleshoot, repair, and modify developmental and production electronic components, equipment, and systems such as industrial and computer controls, manufacturing systems, communication systems, and power electronic systems.

Each student graduating worked on a unique major project to demonstrate the knowledge they gained from the EET program. A few notable projects included a Nixie tube clock made using display tubes from the 1970s to show the time, a Morse code trainer used to teach people how to read Morse code and convert it to English, and an air quality sensor that monitors ambient temperature, humidity and dangerous levels of certain gases.

Additionally, all seven graduates successfully passed the exam to receive their Certified Electronics Technician certification from the International Electronics Technicians Association. While this certification is not required to work in the electronics engineering industry, it will set Surry’s graduates apart from others in their profession when applying for jobs and seeking promotions.

Many of the EET program’s recent graduates have already procured employment or higher education opportunities due to their hard work and the high employability of those in the advanced manufacturing field with multiple students having lined up post-graduate professional plans as early as six months prior to finishing their degrees.

Computer and Electronics Engineering Technologies Division Chair Dr. Clayton Workman worked with students and companies to place students Samuel Harris and Jordan Easter in part-time positions at Hirsch Solutions and Dorsett Technologies, respectively, in the fall of their second year at Surry with the intent to transition to full-time employment upon completion of their studies; both Harris and Easter enjoyed the additional experience they gained while part time, and have transitioned to full-time employment with ease.

Graduate Benjamen Underwood secured an internship with Ashley Furniture Industries Inc., which is off to a great start, and will continue during his education at UNC-Charlotte in the fall when he begins pursuit of a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering.

Those interested in learning more about Surry’s Electronics Engineering Technology degree program can visit www.surry.edu or contact Computer and Electronics Engineering Technologies Division Chair Dr. Clayton Workman at 336-386-3270 or [email protected] Follow the program at facebook.com/surryelectronics.

Students enrolled in Surry Community College’s Electronics Engineering Technology program each work on a unique project demonstrating the skills they learn in class. Pictured is recent graduate Jordan Easter’s project – a Nixie tube clock using display tubes from the 1970s to show the time. Since graduating, Easter, of Ararat, Virginia, has begun working full time at Dorsett Technologies in Yadkinville.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_JEaster-Nixie-Tube-Clock-5b1-5d.jpgStudents enrolled in Surry Community College’s Electronics Engineering Technology program each work on a unique project demonstrating the skills they learn in class. Pictured is recent graduate Jordan Easter’s project – a Nixie tube clock using display tubes from the 1970s to show the time. Since graduating, Easter, of Ararat, Virginia, has begun working full time at Dorsett Technologies in Yadkinville. Submitted photo

Seven students recently graduated from Surry Community College with an associate degree from the Electronics Engineering Technology program. They are, from left, Computer and Electronics Engineering Technologies Division Chair Dr. Clayton Workman, Jordan O’Neal of Ararat, Jacob Galyean of Mount Airy, Samuel Harris of Dobson, Carolyn Shockley of Tobaccoville, Jordan Easter of Ararat, Virginia, Benjamen Underwood of Yadkinville, and Luis Garin of Elkin.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/web1_ETT-GRADS.jpgSeven students recently graduated from Surry Community College with an associate degree from the Electronics Engineering Technology program. They are, from left, Computer and Electronics Engineering Technologies Division Chair Dr. Clayton Workman, Jordan O’Neal of Ararat, Jacob Galyean of Mount Airy, Samuel Harris of Dobson, Carolyn Shockley of Tobaccoville, Jordan Easter of Ararat, Virginia, Benjamen Underwood of Yadkinville, and Luis Garin of Elkin. Submitted photo

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