790 people ran out of luck this St. Patrick’s Day arrested for impaired driving


RALEIGH — The N.C. Department of Transportation and the N.C. Governor’s Highway Safety Program announced the results from the St. Patrick’s “Booze It and Lose It” campaign, which ran from March 16-20. There were 790 DWI charges, in which 718 were alcohol related and 72 were drug related, averaging 198 DWI arrests per day.

In Elkin, no DWIs were issued, according to Elkin Police Capt. Kim Robison. Numbers reported by EPD are two speeding, two no operator’s license, one unsafe movement, one resist, obstruct and delay and four wanted persons apprehended.

“Our campaigns help people realize that drinking and driving is a matter of life and death, and that one wrong decision can have devastating consequences,” said Don Nail, director of the Governor’s Highway Safety Program. “We appreciate the work North Carolina’s law enforcement officers do, not only during our campaigns but throughout the year, that help save lives and keep impaired drivers off the road.”

The campaign also yielded 2,474 traffic and criminal citations from 2,813 checking stations and saturation patrols across the state. Over 400 law enforcement agencies participated in the campaign.

The top five counties for DWI arrests during the campaign were:

Cumberland County – 89

Mecklenburg County – 49

Brunswick County – 44

Robeson County – 41

Forsyth County – 40

The N.C. Department of Transportation and Governor’s Highway Safety Program promoted sober driving through the St. Patrick’s holiday through its “Don’t Drink and Drive. You’re Smarter Than That.” marketing campaign. It highlighted the variety of options that are readily available to those who need to get home after drinking — including calling a friend, using a taxi or ride service, taking public transportation, or designating a driver.

For more information regarding “Booze It & Lose It” activities and county totals, contact Jonathan Bandy at 919-814-3657 or visit the GHSP website.

Elkin Tribune
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