Weather clears for flea market


By Kathy Chaffin - [email protected]



William Baldwin and his wife, Monika, of Elkin sold houses and other miniatures made out of matchsticks at the Labor Day Flea Market and Festival at Lila Swaim Park in Jonesville.


Jordan Anderson, from left, and his twin, Jacob, pose for a photograph with Judy Wolfe, president of the Jonesville Historical Society, and Cynthia Cothren, executive director of The Ark. who was selling raffle tickets for a handmade quilt.


Two-year-old Jayce Bo Collins plays in a bouncy house while his father, Hardin Collins, watches.


Three-year-old Maggie Hernandez seemed to enjoy the slide in the playground area behind where vendors set up for the Labor Day Flea Market and Festival. She attended with her parents, Martina and Hernaldo Hernandez, and her little brother, who is also named Hernaldo.


Don Adams, from left, of Jonesville helped his son, Steven, sell hot dogs at the annual flea market and festival.


Leslie Roope sold aloe plants that were offshoots of a bigger plant that belonged to her mother, Luellen Phillips, who died three years ago at age 58 of complications from breast cancer.


Brandi Semones of East Bend, from left, and her friend, Lisa Schrader of Yadkinville, pause from their shopping to eat hot dogs at a picnic table. They didn't know about the festival until they saw signs advertising it while looking for yard sales in the area.


Carrie Martin of Jonesville sold a variety of items, including collectible Fenton glassware.


Christi Pate of the Starmount High School Band Boosters Club holds up a band uniform to point out tears, fraying ribbons, holes and stains. One of the shoes hanging at the top even had a big crack in it.


Saturday’s early morning rain cleared just in time for vendors to set up at the annual Labor Day Flea Market and Festival at Lila Swaim Park in Jonesville.

About 40 vendors turned out for the opening of the three-day flea market and festival, which started at 9 a.m. William and Monika Baldwin of Elkin were among the first vendors to arrive, setting up right beside the Jonesville Historical Society tents with their matchstick creations, including houses and cabins of all sizes, lighthouses, sailboats, even a liquor still.

William Baldwin said a man bought the only sailboat he had around 9:30. He said he taught himself how to make the matchstick miniatures and has never ran into anyone else who makes them.

“I basically got the idea from little ceramic houses,” he said. Baldwin said he used to have an oil stove and used a lot of matches lighting it so he had plenty of material for his work.

This was the second year the Baldwins have sold their matchstick creations at the Labor Day Flea Market and Festival. Prices for their miniature creations ranged from $7 for a small cabin to $125 for a larger house with lights inside. Baldwin said he sometimes even builds furniture from matchsticks to put inside the larger houses.

The Baldwins sell their matchstick pieces all over the area and have traveled as far away as Baltimore, Maryland, and Chesapeake, Virginia, to sell them at shows and festivals.

Judy Wolfe, who heads up the Jonesville Historical Society, arrived early to provide assistance to vendors and answer any questions they might have. The flea market and festival is the annual fundraiser for the Historical Society and the $15 weekend vendor fee and other money raised from the sale of items donated and a video featuring actual footage of races at the Jonesville Speedway and history of the park will be used to add the names of World War II veterans from Yadkin, Surry and Wilkes counties on plaques at Mineral Springs Memorial Park.

This year was the first time Brandi Semones of East Bend and Lisa Schrader of Yadkinville had been to the flea market and festival. They saw signs advertising it when they were out looking for yard sales in the Jonesville-Elkin area and said they were really enjoying it.

Semones and Schrader sat at a picnic table enjoying the hot dogs they had purchased from Steven Adams of Jonesville, also known as the “Hot Dog Boy,” and his father, Don Adams, also of Jonesville. Their $5 special, which included two hot dogs with all the trimmings, a pack of potato chips and a drink, was popular with customers.

Cynthia Cheek and her stepdaughter, Lyndsay, were helping to sell items donated by Starmount High School Band Booster members to raise money for new uniforms for the band members along with Christi Pate, who said she was the “treasurer/fundraiser/whatever they tell me to do person” for the club.

In explaining the need, Pate pointed to a uniform hanging from the tent poles. “It’s missing buttons,” she said, “and the ribbon trim is fraying. It’s stained like crazy … picked beyond being able to be fixed … It has got holes in it, rips, tears, about anything that could happen to it.

“We have to piece together uniforms to make sure everybody gets one.”

Cynthia Cheek pointed to a large crack in one of the shoes that goes with the uniform.

It will take $30,000 to replace the band’s old uniforms, which are more than 15 years old, they said. “We have about $2,700 in the uniform budget,” Pate said, “but that’s been raised over the last three or four years.

“We need donations,” she said. “It’s sad all of our uniforms are like this one.”

Robbin Wagoner was helping even though her son, Jordan, is a senior and will have graduated by the time they are able to buy new uniforms.

Pate said members of Starmount’s Band Booster Club will rotate being at the flea market and festival all three days.

When asked about the items spread out on her table, Leslie Roope said she had a few antiques among them. “I am actually helping Vestal Auctions so we’re doing security,” she said, pointing to a nearby travel trailer. “I’m living here for the weekend so we’re monitoring everything.”

April Burcham of Elkin had Nature’s Pearl products and Mary Kay items on her table. “I’m basically trying to get people signed up for Nature’s Pearl and free Mary Kay facials,” she said, “but I’ve got some products for sale if anyone wants them.”

Burcham was also selling her handmade jewelry. “And you won’t believe what they’re made out of,” she said, pointing to the necklace chains. “Metallic embroidery thread.”

The flea market and festival also featured special music and Bingo games on Friday and Labor Day. Bouncy houses were available for children, who also played on the park equipment behind the vendors.

Contact Kathy Chaffin at 336-258-4058.

William Baldwin and his wife, Monika, of Elkin sold houses and other miniatures made out of matchsticks at the Labor Day Flea Market and Festival at Lila Swaim Park in Jonesville.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_IMG_5239.jpgWilliam Baldwin and his wife, Monika, of Elkin sold houses and other miniatures made out of matchsticks at the Labor Day Flea Market and Festival at Lila Swaim Park in Jonesville.

Jordan Anderson, from left, and his twin, Jacob, pose for a photograph with Judy Wolfe, president of the Jonesville Historical Society, and Cynthia Cothren, executive director of The Ark. who was selling raffle tickets for a handmade quilt.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_IMG_5286.jpgJordan Anderson, from left, and his twin, Jacob, pose for a photograph with Judy Wolfe, president of the Jonesville Historical Society, and Cynthia Cothren, executive director of The Ark. who was selling raffle tickets for a handmade quilt.

Two-year-old Jayce Bo Collins plays in a bouncy house while his father, Hardin Collins, watches.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_IMG_5303.jpgTwo-year-old Jayce Bo Collins plays in a bouncy house while his father, Hardin Collins, watches.

Three-year-old Maggie Hernandez seemed to enjoy the slide in the playground area behind where vendors set up for the Labor Day Flea Market and Festival. She attended with her parents, Martina and Hernaldo Hernandez, and her little brother, who is also named Hernaldo.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_IMG_5271.jpgThree-year-old Maggie Hernandez seemed to enjoy the slide in the playground area behind where vendors set up for the Labor Day Flea Market and Festival. She attended with her parents, Martina and Hernaldo Hernandez, and her little brother, who is also named Hernaldo.

Don Adams, from left, of Jonesville helped his son, Steven, sell hot dogs at the annual flea market and festival.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_IMG_5292.jpgDon Adams, from left, of Jonesville helped his son, Steven, sell hot dogs at the annual flea market and festival.

Leslie Roope sold aloe plants that were offshoots of a bigger plant that belonged to her mother, Luellen Phillips, who died three years ago at age 58 of complications from breast cancer.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_IMG_5264.jpgLeslie Roope sold aloe plants that were offshoots of a bigger plant that belonged to her mother, Luellen Phillips, who died three years ago at age 58 of complications from breast cancer.

Brandi Semones of East Bend, from left, and her friend, Lisa Schrader of Yadkinville, pause from their shopping to eat hot dogs at a picnic table. They didn’t know about the festival until they saw signs advertising it while looking for yard sales in the area.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_IMG_5290.jpgBrandi Semones of East Bend, from left, and her friend, Lisa Schrader of Yadkinville, pause from their shopping to eat hot dogs at a picnic table. They didn’t know about the festival until they saw signs advertising it while looking for yard sales in the area.

Carrie Martin of Jonesville sold a variety of items, including collectible Fenton glassware.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_IMG_5281.jpgCarrie Martin of Jonesville sold a variety of items, including collectible Fenton glassware.

Christi Pate of the Starmount High School Band Boosters Club holds up a band uniform to point out tears, fraying ribbons, holes and stains. One of the shoes hanging at the top even had a big crack in it.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_IMG_5253.jpgChristi Pate of the Starmount High School Band Boosters Club holds up a band uniform to point out tears, fraying ribbons, holes and stains. One of the shoes hanging at the top even had a big crack in it.

By Kathy Chaffin

[email protected]

Elkin Tribune
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