All posts by englewoodindependent

NCHSAA playoff results

First Posted: 2:36 pm - May 24th, 2016

By Kristian Russell - [email protected]



The Forbush Falcons salute their fans before taking a bow after their 6-0 win on Monday night.
Kristian Russell | The Tribune
Macey York finds space down the sideline on Monday night. York had two goals for the Falcons.
Kristian Russell | The Tribune
Elkin’s Bayle Wood placed third in Discus at the State Championship on Saturday afternoon.
Photo courtesy of Michelle S. Wood
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EAST BEND — As the NCHSAA playoffs wind down, the only two teams remaining are the Forbush Falcons softball and soccer teams.

On Monday night, the Falcons soccer team played its quarterfinal match against East Lincoln. The Falcons got off to a great start as Michaela Stone grabbed the first goal of the night in the 6th minute. Stone found the rebound after the ball was crossed in, and took a shot from 18 yards out to hit the upper 90 and give Forbush a 1-0 lead.

Four minutes later, the Falcons were back at it as Emily Marcincavage added her name to the score sheet with an outstanding goal after the ball went through three East Lincoln defenders before finding Marcincavage’s feet. With a 2-0 lead, the Falcons controlled the tempo of the game for the rest of the half.

In the final eight minutes of the game, the Falcons scored two goals (Macey York, and Marley Martin) to take a 4-0 lead at the half.

“We had a great start, we had the mentality for this game,” said Head Coach Kenan James. “We had a lot of opportunities and we capitalized on them.”

The second half the Falcons didn’t let up their tempo as Macey York scored her second goal of the night in the opening minute of the half. From there, the Falcons put it on cruise control as they had a commanding 5-0 lead. With time winding down, Madelyn Crews found herself in prime position to score another goal for the Falcons as she beat a defender to find the back of the net to get the 6-0 win.

“Our game plan was to make sure we came out early because we didn’t know what the weather was going to be like,” said James. “I think we did that. We played our game, and we played it well.”

The Falcons will move on to the 2A Semifinals where they will face Central Academy on Tuesday night. Results were not available by press deadline.

Track:

GREENSBORO — The NCHSAA 1A Track & Field Championships were held on Friday and Saturday in Greensboro. Several athletes from Elkin, East Wilkes and Starmount made it to States.

Elkin’s Bayle Wood placed third overall in Discus, while Elkin’s Jacob Parker placed second in the Men’s 3200 Meter Run.

Starmount’s Trey Lomax placed second in the Men’s 110 Meter Hurdles with a time of 15.28. Starmount’s Jennifer Johnson also placed for the Rams as she placed third in the Triple Jump. Johnson also placed 10th in the Long Jump and 6th in the 100 Meter Dash, while Hannah Shell placed 14th in the High Jump. Also for Starmount, Jack McCormick placed 13th in the Men’s 400 Meter Dash and Brandon Prescott placed 6th in the Triple Jump.

East Wilkes athletes Kyle Rhodes placed third in the 3200 Meter Run, and Alexis Pardue placed 11th in Shot Put.

In the 2A NCHSAA Track & Field Championships, which also took place in Greensboro, Forbush had several athletes compete. Zane Johnson place fifth in Discus, and ninth in Shot Put. Dakota Mendenhall placed third in the 1600 Meter Run, Schuyler Eldridge placed eighth in the 400 Meter Dash, the Girls 4×800 team placed eighth, Sierra Winters placed 13th in the 3200 Meter Dash and Anna Kathryn Kilby placed fifth in the 3200 Meter Dash.

Kristian Russell can be reached at 336-258-4052 or on Twitter @YadkinElkSports.

The Forbush Falcons salute their fans before taking a bow after their 6-0 win on Monday night.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0287.jpgThe Forbush Falcons salute their fans before taking a bow after their 6-0 win on Monday night. Kristian Russell | The Tribune

Macey York finds space down the sideline on Monday night. York had two goals for the Falcons.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0283.jpgMacey York finds space down the sideline on Monday night. York had two goals for the Falcons. Kristian Russell | The Tribune

Elkin’s Bayle Wood placed third in Discus at the State Championship on Saturday afternoon.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_state-track-meet-hr-1377-247-588-1377247588002.jpgElkin’s Bayle Wood placed third in Discus at the State Championship on Saturday afternoon. Photo courtesy of Michelle S. Wood

By Kristian Russell

[email protected]

HCMH earns ‘A’ grade for patient safety

First Posted: 1:16 pm - May 24th, 2016

Staff Report



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Hugh Chatham Memorial Hospital has again received an “A” grade for its commitment to protecting patients from accidents, errors, injuries and infections. The Leapfrog Group awarded Hugh Chatham another top score in the recently released spring 2016 Hospital Safety Score.

The hospital has now received an “A” grade in five consecutive semiannual reporting periods.

“Eliminating preventable harm to patients is an absolute imperative. This continued recognition from the Leapfrog Group speaks to our organizational and cultural commitment to patient safety as the top priority for our employees and medical staff,” said Paul Hammes, chief executive officer of Hugh Chatham Memorial Hospital.

Hospital Safety Scores are calculated under the guidance of Leapfrog’s Blue Ribbon Expert Panel, using 28 measures of publicly available hospital safety data to produce a single “A”, “B”, “C”, “D” or “F” score representing a hospital’s overall capacity to keep patients safe from preventable harm. The Hospital Safety Score is fully transparent, and its website offers a full analysis of the data and methodology used in determining grades.

“Safety should come first for our families when we pick a hospital, because errors and infections are common and deadly,” Leapfrog CEO Leah Binder said in a news release.

To see how Hugh Chatham Memorial Hospital’s score compares locally and nationally, and to access safety tips for patients, visit the Hospital Safety Score website at www.hospitalsafetyscore.org or follow The Hospital Safety Score on Twitter or Facebook. Consumers can also download the free Hospital Safety Score mobile app for Apple and Android devices.

Founded in 2000 by large employers and other purchasers, The Leapfrog Group is a national nonprofit organization driving a movement for giant leaps forward in the quality and safety of American health care. The flagship Leapfrog Hospital Survey collects and transparently reports hospital performance, empowering purchasers to find the highest-value care and giving consumers the lifesaving information they need to make informed decisions. Hospital Safety Score, Leapfrog’s other main initiative, assigns letter grades to hospitals based on their record of patient safety, helping consumers protect themselves and their families from errors, injuries, accidents, and infections.

Hugh Chatham is a not-for-profit community health care network of physician clinics and hospital that delivers a seamless and convenient health care experience to communities in the Yadkin Valley region of North Carolina and Virginia. Hugh Chatham includes a medical group of more than 45 providers and nearly 800 employees who provide patient-and family-centered care at 20 locations. Headquartered in Elkin, North Carolina, Hugh Chatham is a leader in using technology to coordinate care for patients and to provide opportunities for patients to interact with the health system. For more information, please visit our web site at HughChatham.org. You can also follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Staff Report

Rash forced to cancel reading, signing

First Posted: 11:55 am - May 24th, 2016

Staff Report



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The Ron Rash book reading and signing originally slated for Thursday at the Elkin Public Library has been cancelled. The award-winning author and poet was forced to cancel the event due to health issues concerning his back and advisement from his doctor.

The members of the Elkin Public Library Board of Trustees are hoping the reading will be rescheduled for a later date this year once Rash is feeling better and able to make an appearance.

Staff Report

Letter to the editor

First Posted: 2:32 pm - May 23rd, 2016

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To the Editor,

Farewell, Mrs. Thomasson

To the woman who tamed the 3D printer and utilized the Dewey Decimal System with finesse:

I recently heard of your retirement plans, Mrs. Thomasson. I will need to adjust to the idea you won’t be my next door librarian. I had hoped we would both retire together, seeing as I have only 26 more years to go. Alas, it was not to be.

After countless days working together on chromebook initiatives, apps, and digital platforms, it’s safe to say we’ve had our fill of 21st century skills (I’m taking the liberty of speaking on behalf of the entire English department). But don’t worry, Mrs. Thomasson. Come next school year we will wake up wide-eyed and bushy-tailed — perhaps out of fear or anxiety — for that legendary chromebook rollout, minus one. You will be missed.

We won’t forget the extra effort you put into our teacher appreciation tokens and other holiday gifts, either. Of course, this meant that you taught the media assistants an important life lesson: hard labor without pay. But it was so worth it to see those cute items left in our staff boxes. Again, you will be missed.

Without your help in research, informational books, and countless other things, I don’t think we teachers could have survived under the weight of The Research Paper. Students across the county shudder at those words. Thank you for being a beacon in the storm and a wealth of knowledge. You will be missed.

Finally, the school wide inventory list, your prized possession, will not go undone despite your retirement. I’m sure that another highly-qualified staff member will be involuntarily selected for this role, most likely Mr. Petree. You will be sorely missed.

Mrs. Thomasson, you have been an invaluable resource, supportive coworker, and a caring friend to us all. Thank you for all the diligent hard work and extra hours you have invested in this school to inspire children to read and enrich their learning. Our students are all the better for it.

Congratulations on a well-deserved retirement, but remember you will be missed!

Best wishes,

Laura Cave

Starmount High Teacher and Newspaper Editor

Community Calendar

First Posted: 10:53 am - May 23rd, 2016

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Submission guidelines for calendar events: One-time events may be submitted for placement in the calendar at least two weeks prior to the date of the event. Information should include date, time, place, brief description and contact information, if necessary. Calendars are published as space permits and do not run in every issue of the paper. If a submission is not showing, it is due to the chronological order of the events. Events to be included are at our discretion, and information is subject to editing. Send events to [email protected]

May 23

• 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., the Small Business Center of Surry Community College will offer “Business Structure” at The Center for Public Safety, 1220 S. State St., Mount Airy. The speaker will be attorney Robert Wall. The seminar will discuss the difference between a sole proprietor, partnership and corporation. It also will impress the importance of record keeping, and give an overview of tax responsibilities. To register for any Small Business Center seminars or view a complete listing of offerings, visit www.surry.edu/sbc. For more information, call 336-386-3685.

• 6:30 to 8 p.m., the Elkin Public Library will host Knit Nights at the library the fourth Monday of each month. It will be an evening for new and experienced knitters as well as those who crochet, stitch, sew and more, to knit, socialize and share tips and patterns. All levels are welcome. Beginning instruction can be provided for those who wish to learn. Bring a project to work on. No registration is required. For more information, contact Kasey Nowalk at 336-835-5586 or [email protected]

May 23-27

• The town of Jonesville will holds its annual spring clean up week. Items accepted include tires off the rim, rims can be picked up as metal, mattresses, appliances, furniture, carpet, computers, TVs, printers and electronics and more. Not accepted are paints, oils, chemicals, liquids of any kind, yard waste, wood, glass, car parts, cement, rocks, building material. This is for residential homes only, no businesses or apartments. All items should be placed at the edge of the grass, not in the street. For more information, call the town at 336-835-4068.

May 24

• 7 p.m., Austin Volunteer Fire Department will host a community meeting to discuss the fire tax rate at the station, 7170 Austin-Traphill Road, Elkin. Anyone who lives in and/or pays taxes in the Austin Fire District can attend. Refreshments will be provided following the meeting.

May 25

• Noon, Operation: GoodJobs is hosting a veteran hire fair from noon to 2 p.m., with the job fair open to the public from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Goodwill Career Connections, 1457 N. Bridge St., Elkin. For more information, call 336-786-4169 or 336-526-2144 or visit goodwillnwnc.org.

May 26

• 11:30 a.m., the Rotary Golf Tournament to benefit the Upper Yadkin Valley Habitat for Humanity will be held at Cedarbrook Country Club with buffet lunch at 11:30 a.m. and shotgun start at 1 p.m. It concludes with skill awards and door prizes. Cost is $50 per person. For more information, call Sam Wagoner at 336-466-2543.

• 5 to 7 p.m., the Small Business Center of Surry Community College will offer “Federal Contracting and SBA Programs/Services” at The Center for Public Safety, Room 111, 1220 S. State St., Mount Airy. Participants will find out how to access the federal marketplace and about federal certifications. Joe Ann Shaeffers will be the speaker. To register for any Small Business Center seminars or view a complete listing of offerings, visit www.surry.edu/sbc. For more information, call 336-386-3685.

May 26-28

• The Elkin VFW Post 7794 and Yadkin VFW Post 10346 will distribute Buddy Poppies at the Elkin Walmart, with members on site each day. Proceeds from donations accepted will be used to support veterans programs and other community groups and activities in the tri-country area.

May 28

• 9 a.m., Chatham Nursing & Rehabilitation will host the Duncan Dash, a family and pet-friendly fun fun/walk to raise awareness for the Alzheimer’s dementia population at Elkin Municipal Park, Elkin. Registration starts at 9 a.m. with a balloon send-off ceremony at 9:45 a.m. at the starting line. The walk begins at 10 a.m. There will be several items raffled off, a hot dog cookout for donations, a bouncy house, face painting and more. Registration is free, T-shirts are $10. The Alzheimer’s Association will receive at least 75 percent of the proceeds collected.

• 1 p.m., a special Memorial Day ceremony will be held on the courthouse lawn in Sparta, consisting of speakers from the VFW including State VFW Senior Vice Commander Doug Blevins, the American Legion, the Marine Corps League, and Mayor John Miller. The ceremony will conclude with the laying of the wreaths by the VFW and the Marine Corps League and featuring the honor guard of the VFW presenting a 21-gun salute and playing of “Taps.” At the conclusion of the ceremony, all military personnel will assemble at the north end of town for the Memorial Day Parade. To enter a vehicle or float, contact Thomas Owens at 336-657-1484.

• 5 p.m., Austin Fire and Rescue, 7170 Austin-Traphill Road, will host Bingo with food available at 5 p.m. and games starting at 6 p.m. Game cards cost 50 cents, $1 and $2. There will be prizes and 50/50 games. For more information, call 336-957-2182.

May 29

• 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., a blood drive will be held at Calvary Baptist Church, 314 S. Franklin Road, Mount Airy.

May 30

• 10 a.m., Captain Mark Garner Post 7794 Veterans of Foreign Wars will present the annual Memorial Day Ceremony honor the area’s fallen veterans at Elkin Municipal Park. This year’s featured speaker will be Elkin Mayor Lestine Hutchens. The program also will feature a presentation of colors and laying of the wreath by members of the Elkin High School Junior Army ROTC Unit. Due to limited seating, those attending are encouraged to bring lawn chairs.

• Noon to 4:30 p.m., a blood drive will be held at First United Methodist Church of Pilot Mountain, 210 Marion St., Pilot Mountain.

June 2

• 6:45 to 8 p.m., Elkin Public Library, 111 N. Front St., Elkin, will host Talkin Service, a reading and discussion program for veterans. The five-session book club will be led by Richard Hackler, a local veteran, pastor and Team Red White and Blue captain. The sessions will be May 19, June 2, June 16, June 30 and July 7. Books will be provided to all who participate in the free program, and refreshments will be provided. Sign up at the library front desk, call 336-835-5586 or email Kasey Nowalk at [email protected]

June 3

• 6 p.m. to midnight, the Relay for Life of Elkin will be held at Elkin Municipal Park. Teams may begin setting up tents at 4 p.m. and opening ceremony will be at 6 p.m. with survivor lap to follow at 6:20 p.m. The luminaria lighting will be at 9 p.m. Participants can register at www.relayforlife.org/elkinnc, and luminaries may be purchased online and will be available at the event. For more information, contact Melissa Hiatt at 336-755-8566.

June 4

• 1 p.m., a golf tournament fundraiser will be held at Silo Run Golf Course, 4040 Rockford Road, Boonville, to help pay the way for students at Rhythm on Main to go to Disney. Lunch and registration will begin at 1 p.m. Format is four-player captain’s choice, and there will be prizes for the top three teams, longest drive and closest to pin. Door prizes will be awarded as well. For more informatino, email [email protected]

June 7

• 8:30 a.m., the Yadkin Valley Senior Center will host a day trip to Shatley Springs. Cost is $13 for registered nutrition site participants, and $20 for nonregistered. Call the senior center at 336-526-1087 to sign up.

June 11

• The Foothills 5K WetRun will be held at Elkin Municipal Park featuring various water elements soaking runners and then ending the course with a large blow-up water slide. Following the race will be a concert by Christian artists Michael Tait with Newsboys. Medals will be given out following the race as well. Runners can register at the event, or in advance at foothillswetrun.com. Proceeds benefit CauseLife and will be used to build wells, providing clean water in third-world countries.

June 16

• 6:45 to 8 p.m., Elkin Public Library, 111 N. Front St., Elkin, will host Talkin Service, a reading and discussion program for veterans. The five-session book club will be led by Richard Hackler, a local veteran, pastor and Team Red White and Blue captain. The sessions will be May 19, June 2, June 16, June 30 and July 7. Books will be provided to all who participate in the free program, and refreshments will be provided. Sign up at the library front desk, call 336-835-5586 or email Kasey Nowalk at [email protected]

• 5:30 p.m., the annual Trails Boogie will be held at The Liberty, 222 E. Main St., Elkin, with social hour at 5:30 p.m and band starting at 7 p.m. Event is casual dress and admission is free, with donations providing funding for further trail progress accepted. The evening will include music from Doug Deming with Dennis Gruenling & The Jewel Tones, a silent auction, trails information, dinner buffet for purchase, and beverages.

June 18

• 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., the Surry County support group for the Lupus Foundation of America will be held at the Mount Airy Public Library, 145, Rockford St., Mount Airy, in the multipurpose room. For more information, call 877-849-8271 ext. 2 or visit www.lupusnc.org.

June 20

• 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., a quarterly veterans coffee will be held at Sagebrush Steakhouse, 2000 Woodland Drive, Mount Airy. The event is open to veterans of all ages and military services and provide an opportunity for local veterans to connect with other veterans, share stories and enjoy free coffee, doughnuts and conversation. Government and nonprofit organizations who provide support programs and activities for veterans are invited to attend the events to share information about their programs. For more information, call Don Timmons at 336-331-1309.

June 30

• 6:45 to 8 p.m., Elkin Public Library, 111 N. Front St., Elkin, will host Talkin Service, a reading and discussion program for veterans. The five-session book club will be led by Richard Hackler, a local veteran, pastor and Team Red White and Blue captain. The sessions will be May 19, June 2, June 16, June 30 and July 7. Books will be provided to all who participate in the free program, and refreshments will be provided. Sign up at the library front desk, call 336-835-5586 or email Kasey Nowalk at [email protected]

July 7

• 6:45 to 8 p.m., Elkin Public Library, 111 N. Front St., Elkin, will host Talkin Service, a reading and discussion program for veterans. The five-session book club will be led by Richard Hackler, a local veteran, pastor and Team Red White and Blue captain. The sessions will be May 19, June 2, June 16, June 30 and July 7. Books will be provided to all who participate in the free program, and refreshments will be provided. Sign up at the library front desk, call 336-835-5586 or email Kasey Nowalk at [email protected]

Sept. 19

• 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., a quarterly veterans coffee will be held at Sagebrush Steakhouse, 2000 Woodland Drive, Mount Airy. The event is open to veterans of all ages and military services and provide an opportunity for local veterans to connect with other veterans, share stories and enjoy free coffee, doughnuts and conversation. Government and nonprofit organizations who provide support programs and activities for veterans are invited to attend the events to share information about their programs. For more information, call Don Timmons at 336-331-1309.

Dec. 19

• 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., a quarterly veterans coffee will be held at Sagebrush Steakhouse, 2000 Woodland Drive, Mount Airy. The event is open to veterans of all ages and military services and provide an opportunity for local veterans to connect with other veterans, share stories and enjoy free coffee, doughnuts and conversation. Government and nonprofit organizations who provide support programs and activities for veterans are invited to attend the events to share information about their programs. For more information, call Don Timmons at 336-331-1309.

Ongoing

• 3 p.m., a community drum circle is held each Sunday at Central Park in King. No experience is necessary and extra drums are available for use. Weather updates and additional information can be found on Facebook at Pinnacle Drum Circle. For more information, email [email protected] or call 336-368-3866.

• 10 a.m., line dance class is being held each Monday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville, with Shirley Bell as instructor.

• 11 a.m., quilting class is being held each Monday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 5 to 8 p.m., clogging classes are being held every Monday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville, with beginners from 5 to 6 p.m., intermediate from 6 to 7 p.m. and team practice from 7 to 8 p.m. Cost is $20 per month and it’s open to those 10 and older. Call teacher Janice Nixon at 336-835-4912 to sign up.

• 6 to 8 p.m., each Monday, DivorceCare is a support group that meets at 147 Carter Mill Road, Elkin. The new session starts Feb. 8. It is designed for those hurting from the pain of separation and/or divorce. For more information, call Gwen at 336-244-4682.

• 10:30 a.m., exercise class is held each Tuesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., weaving class is held each Tuesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 5 p.m., the Yadkin Valley Senior Center will host Weight Watchers meetings.

• 6:30 p.m., Alanon Family Group meeting is held each Tuesday at First Baptist Church of Elkin’s Rectory. For more information, call 336-468-0395.

• 6:30 p.m., beginner shag 1 is held each Tuesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 7:45 p.m., beginner shag 2 is held each Tuesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 6 p.m., a monthly Alzheimer’s support group will be held every second Tuesday at Chatham Nursing & Rehab Center, 700 Johnson Ridge Road, Elkin. If area schools are closed due to inclement weather the group will not meet. For more information, call 336-567-7600.

• 7 p.m., the Stone Mountain chapter of Trout Unlimited meets the first Tuesday of each month at the Foothills Arts Council in downtown Elkin. For more information, visit www.smtu.org or the group’s Facebook page.

• 10 a.m., pickleball is held each Wednesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 10 a.m., bingo is held each Wednesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 12:30 p.m., prayer shawl group is held each Wednesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• Noon to 1 p.m., the first Wednesday of each month, a free informational webinar is held for those interested in learning about the Guardian ad Litem program. These volunteers are court-appointed and serve as the judge’s eyes and ears on children going through the foster care system. To register or for more information, call Tammy Baity at 336-651-4465.

• 9 a.m., sewing is held each Thursday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 10 a.m., bingo is held each Thursday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 2 p.m., cards is held each Thursday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., Women In Sobriety, a new closed meeting, is held each Thursday at First Baptist Church of Elkin, 110 Gwyn Ave., Elkin. For more information, call Maureen at 336-258-2520.

• 6:30 to 8 p.m., 4G Club – Girls Growing in God’s Grace, is held each Thursday at the Fairfield Inn’s Conference Room in Elkin. It is a meeting for girls 13 to 25 to come together and bond. Regular rap sessions are held about depression, fear, anger, jealously and other topics the girls want to discuss. They will learn about talents and how to help others by using what each is already gifted with. For more information, call Christy Martin at 336-514-9452 or Joyce Martin at 336-258-2338.

• 5:30 p.m., the Jonesville Historical Society meets the third Thursday of each month at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center.

• 10 a.m., Tribune news is held each Thursday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 6 p.m., the Yadkin Valley Senior Center will host Art Party with Jan each first Friday of the month. The event is open to the public and cost of $35 includes all materials needed. Registration is required prior to the day of the art party by calling the center at 336-527-1087.

Area Alcoholics Anonymous meetings are held with the following schedule:

• 10:15 a.m., every Sunday at 218 Rockford St., Andy Griffith Playhouse downstairs, closed speaker discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., last Sunday of each month, at Mount Airy,(Granite City Group) Central United Methodist Church, North Main Street, closed discussion with an open speaker meeting. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Monday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group), 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, open speaker. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Monday in Mount Airy, (Mayberry Group) Old Train Depot, 580 Granite St., open speaker. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• Noon, every Tuesday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group), 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, open speaker. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 7 p.m., every Tuesday in Pilot Mountain (Pilot Mtn. Group), First United Methodist Church, N.C. 268 and Marion Street. Closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 7:30 p.m., every Tuesday at Yadkinville (Serenity Group) at Methodist Church, 204 W. Main St. Downstairs beneath old sanctuary, closed discussion with open speaker meeting last Tuesday of each month. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Tuesday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group) 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, Closed 12 & 12 study. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• Noon, every Wednesday, in Mount Airy (Primary Purpose), at First Presbyterian Church, 326 S. Main St., fellowship hall at corner of South Main and Church streets. Closed big book discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 7 p.m., every Wednesday, in Mount Airy (Mayberry Men’s Meeting), Rockford Street United Methodist Church, 520 Rockford St., closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Wednesday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group), 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, closed big book study. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Wednesday in Mount Airy, (Mayberry Group) Old Train Depot, 580 Granite St., closed big book study. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• Noon, every Thursday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group), 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 7:30 p.m., every Thursday at Yadkinville (Serenity Group) at Methodist Church, 204 W. Main St., downstairs beneath old sanctuary, closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Friday in Dobson (New Beginnings Group) at Dobson United Methodist Church, 204 S. Main St., building behind church, closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Friday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group), 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• Noon, every Saturday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group) 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, closed discussion.

• 8 p.m., every Saturday in Dobson (Hope Valley Meeting) at Hope Valley, Prison Camp Road, open speaker. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

Elkin JROTC cadets receive honors during annual awards ceremony

First Posted: 5:30 am - May 23rd, 2016

By Wendy Byerly Wood - [email protected]



Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Those cadets awarded included Missy Fuentes and Tanner Sturdivant by The Association of the U.S. Army, for exceptional service to school, country and corps of cadets. The National Guard Superior Cadet Award was given to Grant Lloyd, and the U.S. Army Scholar Athlete Award, for athletic ability and leadership ability, went to Karla Romero and Alexander Duncan. The U.S. Marine Corps Scholastic Excellence Award was presented to Hardin Walker and Kylie Thomas; and the U.S. Marine Corps Outstanding Band Member went to Maxwell Dumas and Laken Lloyd.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Members of the Elkin High School JROTC Raiders team earn their high school letters and pins during Wednesday’s JROTC awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Grant Lloyd, left, and Matthew Waddell are recognized for earning more than $120,000 in scholarships with Lloyd headed to The Citadel and Waddell to Appalachian State University.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Grant Lloyd, left, and Matthew Waddell are recognized for earning more than $120,000 in scholarships with Lloyd headed to The Citadel and Waddell to Appalachian State University.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Grant Lloyd, left, and Matthew Waddell are recognized for earning more than $120,000 in scholarships with Lloyd headed to The Citadel and Waddell to Appalachian State University.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune
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Two Elkin High School JROTC cadets have been awarded with more than $120,000 in scholarships from the U.S. Army, and were recognized along with numerous other cadets during the annual JROTC awards ceremony held Wednesday.

Grant Lloyd, this year’s battalion commander for the Elkin JROTC unit, has been awarded a four-year full ride worth $80,000 to The Citadel, while Matthew Waddell, who has served as Elkin’s training officer, is the recipient of a $47,000 scholarship to Appalachian State University where he will be a member of the ROTC unit there. Both will serve in the military following college.

JROTC senior Army instructor Maj. Roy Ferguson, who was assisted by instructors 1st Sgt. Kenneth Abrams and cadet Laken Lloyd, recognized the cadets for their many successes and honors during the school year.

He explained to those attending, which include students, parents and community members, the unit this year participated in four Raider meets, hosted one drill meet, held two middle school day presentations, gave 15 Color Guard performances for the school and community, went on two rappelling and canoeing trips to Raven Knob and hosted two blood drives where 150 units were collected.

Also, the unit was inspected by its Higher Headquarters Cadet Command from Fort Bragg, and received a 97 percent rating, which placed the local unit in the top six percent of Army JROTC programs in the five-state brigade.

For Memorial Day, the cadets will place more than 500 American flags on the gravesites of veterans in the region.

The top three fundraising performers for the year were presented with $50 gift cards. Those cadets were Drake Yarwood, Samuel Booher and Shania Casstevens.

Also honored with certificates and Sheetz gift cards were volunteers and members of the community who have assisted the JROTC in its projects including Jimmy and Pam Lloyd, Trish Long, Sam Bishop, Beth Felts, Ricky Roop, Barbara Long, Alene Brown, Wendy Wood and Serena Martin.

Raider team members were recognized for their hard work during the year, winning during Raider competitions streamers in the Humvee pull, obstacle course and physical fitness test. Nine of the cadets were presented with varsity letters, and 16 cadets were given the Raider pin for their letter.

The letters went to Maxwell Dumas, Seth Evans, Matthew Waddell, Chase Harris, Carlos Salazar, Irvin Lopez, Zeuz Narvaez, Sam Booher and Kyley Cook. Pins were given to Grant Lloyd, Tanner Sturdivant, Kendall Freeman, Said Islas, John Walker, Charles Walker, Alex Duncan, Justin Redd, Chris Davis, Jacob Hemric, Phoenix Collins, Korbin Powell, Marcus Orta, and cadet support team members Laken Lloyd and Dulce Rodriguez.

Members of the unit’s drill team, which placed second overall in the final home drill meet, were recognized. Cadets included Samuel Booher, Shania Casstevens, Grant Lloyd, Laken Lloyd, Zeuz Narvaez, Karla Romero, Esmeralda Sanchez, Marshall Simons, Charles Walker, John Walker, Drake Yarwood, Maxwell Dumas, Carlos Salazar, Missy Fuentes, Kylie Thomas, Amy Javier, Brandon Garris, Jose Anorve, Matthew Waddell, Facundo Pallotti, Austin Gibson, Korbin Powell, Kyley Cook, Mattie Coe, Andrea Payne, Chase Harris, Tevin Harris, Aaron Billings, Chris Davis, Landon Douglas, Brennon Holbrook, Giuliana Pallotti, Laken Brown, Justin Redd, Jarryn Kelly, Said Islas, Dulce Rodriguez, Tanner Sturdivant, Jordan Martin and Guadalupe Reyes.

The JROTC’s Academic Bowl team made it to the second round of the national competition this year, Ferguson said. Cadets on the team were Laken Lloyd, who was team commander, Maxwell Dumas, Matthew Waddell, Karla Romero, Missy Fuentes and Kylie Thomas.

All of the unit’s cadets were recognized for their participation in the Army 5K held in honor of the Army JROTC program’s 100th anniversary.

The unit’s Color Guard team, made up of Karla Romero, Andrea Payne, Mattie Coe and Kylie Thomas, was recognized.

SAI Leadership Award for class leaders were to Shania Casstevens, Tanner Sturdivant, Kylie Thomas, Maxwell Dumas, Amy Javier and Grant Lloyd. SAI Commitment Award went to Giuliana Pallotti and Jonathan Shillinglaw, who had 12 combined semesters in the JROTC program.

Superior cadet awards, given to the best cadet by LET level and year group, went to LET I cadets Beth Coe and Missy Fuentes; LET II cadets Tanner Sturdivant, Alex Duncan and Facundo Pallotti; LET III cadets Kyley Cook and Maxwell Dumas; and LET IV cadets Shania Casstevens and Dulce Rodriguez.

Winner of the Fourth Brigade essay contest, representing the Elkin battalion, was Landon Douglas. SAI Commendable award went to Karla Romero for improving the JROTC classroom with her artistic talents.

Ferguson went on to present the “most distinguished awards.”

Those included The Association of the U.S. Army, for exceptional service to school, country and corps of cadets, to Missy Fuentes and Tanner Sturdivant.

The National Guard Superior Cadet Award was given to Grant Lloyd, and the U.S. Army Scholar Athlete Award, for athletic ability and leadership ability, went to Karla Romero and Alexander Duncan.

The U.S. Marine Corps Scholastic Excellence Award was presented to Hardin Walker and Kylie Thomas; and the U.S. Marine Corps Outstanding Band Member went to Maxwell Dumas and Laken Lloyd.

The Scottish Rite Award is presented to a cadet in the top 25 percent of his class and has demonstrated great Americanism, explained Ferguson, as he presented the award to Grant Lloyd.

AMVETS American Veterans award was presented to Zeuz Narvaez and Kendall Freeman, for being cadets who show good character and patriotism to their school, community and country.

The Daughter of the American Revolution Award is presented to the cadet in the top 25 percent of her class and exemplified loyalty, patriotism and good character, said Ferguson. The award winners were Laken Lloyd and Karla Romero. The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Award was given to Laken Lloyd.

Two cadets were recognized with the Veterans of Foreign Wars award for demonstrating good achievements in JROTC and good academic achievements. Veteran Sam Bishop presented the award to Kyley Cook and Dulce Rodriguez.

The ROA Reserve Officers Association Award presented to Andrea Payne and Shania Casstevens, for showing good commitment to JROTC and further aptitude for military service, Ferguson said.

The Sons of the American Revolution Award, presented to an outstanding cadet who shows a high degree of merit with respect to leadership qualities soldierly bearing and excellence, was given to Samuel Booher and Brandon Holbrook.

The Sons of the Confederate Veterans Award was presented to Drake Yarwood. The award is given for demonstrating honor, courage and commitment.

The MOA Military Officer Association Award, given to the cadet at the top of his or her class, is physically fit and shows great leadership traits, was awarded to Grant Lloyd.

The American Legion Award was presented to Amy Javier, and is given for leadership and service to the unit, Ferguson said. The National Sojourners Award was presented to Guiliana Pallotti, and is presented to a cadet for the highest level of Americanism.

This year’s Purple Heart Award, an honor Ferguson said is one of the most coveted award and is traditionally kept for a top performer showing all the qualities of a great leader to include high academic success, physical fitness and respect among peers, was presented to Matthew Waddell.

The final presentation of the ceremony was a $1,000 scholarship given to a senior who made the best contribution to the successful blood drive by the American Red Cross. This year’s recipient was Matthew Waddell.

Wendy Byerly Wood may be reached at 336-258-4035 or on Twitter @wendywoodeditor.

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2050.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2054.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2051.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2053.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2052.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2061.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2055.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2057.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2067.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2058.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2069.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Those cadets awarded included Missy Fuentes and Tanner Sturdivant by The Association of the U.S. Army, for exceptional service to school, country and corps of cadets. The National Guard Superior Cadet Award was given to Grant Lloyd, and the U.S. Army Scholar Athlete Award, for athletic ability and leadership ability, went to Karla Romero and Alexander Duncan. The U.S. Marine Corps Scholastic Excellence Award was presented to Hardin Walker and Kylie Thomas; and the U.S. Marine Corps Outstanding Band Member went to Maxwell Dumas and Laken Lloyd.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2065.jpgThose cadets awarded included Missy Fuentes and Tanner Sturdivant by The Association of the U.S. Army, for exceptional service to school, country and corps of cadets. The National Guard Superior Cadet Award was given to Grant Lloyd, and the U.S. Army Scholar Athlete Award, for athletic ability and leadership ability, went to Karla Romero and Alexander Duncan. The U.S. Marine Corps Scholastic Excellence Award was presented to Hardin Walker and Kylie Thomas; and the U.S. Marine Corps Outstanding Band Member went to Maxwell Dumas and Laken Lloyd. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2064.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Members of the Elkin High School Drill Team is recognized during the awards ceremony Wednesday.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2042.jpgMembers of the Elkin High School Drill Team is recognized during the awards ceremony Wednesday. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Members of the Elkin High School JROTC Raiders team earn their high school letters and pins during Wednesday’s JROTC awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2036.jpgMembers of the Elkin High School JROTC Raiders team earn their high school letters and pins during Wednesday’s JROTC awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2049.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2032.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Grant Lloyd, left, and Matthew Waddell are recognized for earning more than $120,000 in scholarships with Lloyd headed to The Citadel and Waddell to Appalachian State University.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0021.jpgGrant Lloyd, left, and Matthew Waddell are recognized for earning more than $120,000 in scholarships with Lloyd headed to The Citadel and Waddell to Appalachian State University. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Grant Lloyd, left, and Matthew Waddell are recognized for earning more than $120,000 in scholarships with Lloyd headed to The Citadel and Waddell to Appalachian State University.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0018.jpgGrant Lloyd, left, and Matthew Waddell are recognized for earning more than $120,000 in scholarships with Lloyd headed to The Citadel and Waddell to Appalachian State University.Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0009.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Grant Lloyd, left, and Matthew Waddell are recognized for earning more than $120,000 in scholarships with Lloyd headed to The Citadel and Waddell to Appalachian State University.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0015.jpgGrant Lloyd, left, and Matthew Waddell are recognized for earning more than $120,000 in scholarships with Lloyd headed to The Citadel and Waddell to Appalachian State University.Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0008.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0003.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0005.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0002.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_0001.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

Cadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_DSC_2071.jpgCadets with the Elkin High School JROTC are presented with awards Wednesday during the annual awards ceremony. Wendy Byerly Wood | The Tribune

By Wendy Byerly Wood

[email protected]

Girls track all conference named

First Posted: 3:12 am - May 23rd, 2016

By Kristian Russell - [email protected]



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The women’s MVAC track all conference and honorable mention awards were released on Thursday afternoon. Lauryn Turner (North Wilkes) and Olivia Bullard (East Wilkes) were voted the 2016 Players of the Year. Ashe County coach Alex Rollins was voted the 2016 Coach of the Year.

All Conference from Elkin, East Wilkes and Starmount are as follows: Gracie Brown (East Wilkes), Catie Beth Brown (Elkin), Olivia Bullard (East Wilkes), Autumn Garcia (East Wilkes), Corinthian Hil (Starmount), Jennifer Johnson (Starmount), Tess Jolly (East Wilkes), Skylar Martin (Starmount), Alexis Pardue (East Wilkes), Cynthia Ramos (Starmount), Hannah Shell (Starmount), and Lizbeth Zuniga (Starmount). Honorable Mention includes Laken Brown (Elkin), Alexis Pardue (East Wilkes), and Paige Waters (East Wilkes).

Other All Conference athletes include Shawntae Carlton (Wilkes Central), Savannah Cary (Ashe), Tashonna Cowles (Wilkes Central), Taylor Curry (Wilkes Central), Katelyn Davis (Alleghany), Chetola Greer (Ashe), Vanessa Guijosa (Ashe), Madelyn Hamby (West Wilkes), Madison Hamby (West Wilkes), Hailey Hogan (Wilkes Central), Ann Jaimes (Wilkes Central), Kaitlyn Jordan (Ashe), Passion Lipford (Wilkes Central), Allison Livengood (North Wilkes), Carrie Lowe (Wilkes Central), Meghan Lyall (Alleghany), Constance Matrix (Ashe), Bella Potter (Ashe), Olivia Randolph (Ashe), Jennifer Rhodes (North Wilkes), Brooklyn Roten (Ashe), Spencer Simino (Ashe), Chloe Sullivan (Ashe), Lacey Triplett (Wilkes Central), Mya Tugman (Wilkes Central), Lauryn Turner (North Wilkes), Emily Vicnic (West Wilkes), Madison Warner (Ashe), and Victoria Young (North Wilkes).

Other Honorable Mention athletes include Kenzie Adkins (Alleghany), Savannah Cary (Ashe), Asia Castilleja (North Wilkes), Whitney Crouse (Alleghany), Katelyn Davis (Alleghany), Jaynee Halvorsen (Wilkes Central), Madelyn Hamby (West Wilkes), Jasmine Horton (Wilkes Central), Tyler Johnson (North Wilkes), Passion Lipford (Wilkes Central), Allison Livengood (North Wilkes), Meghan Lyall (Alleghany), Leah McGrady (Alleghany), Deannh Milhalke (Alleghany), Mookie Miller (Alleghany), Zuemy Morales (Alleghany), Sarah Olson (Wilkes Central), Jennifer Rhodes (North Wilkes), Stacey Townsend (Wilkes Central), Mya Tugman (Wilkes Central), Avery Wood (North Wilkes), and Victoria Young (North Wilkes).

By Kristian Russell

[email protected]

Church calendar

First Posted: 2:45 am - May 23rd, 2016

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June 4

• 7 a.m. to 1 p.m., a multi-family yard sale will be held to benefit the Dennyville Baptist Church youth group at the Century 21 office on North Bridge Street in Elkin.

June 13-17

• Zephyr Missionary Baptist Church, Poplar Springs Road, will host its spring revival at 6 p.m. June 13 and 7 p.m. June 14-17. Guest speaker will be Don Ball, and special singing will be shared each night.

June 14

• 11:30 a.m., Sparta First Baptist Church will host senior adults fellowship.

June 23-25

• The GAP Church will host a two-night trip to Washington, D.C., with pick up at Mayberry Mall in Mount Airy on June 23, and touring sites on June 24 including Jefferson Memorial, U.S. Capitol, FDR Memorial, Martin Luther King Memorial, one-hour boat cruise, White House and more, with return on June 25. The cost of the trip is $365 per person, with the first deposit of $125 due March 1. For more information, call Kathy Dobson at 336-648-1951.

July 18-22

• 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Bannertown Baptist Church, Mount Airy, will host a children’s music camp. Cost of camp is $60 and includes a T-shirt, fun kit, morning snack and drink at lunch. For more information, call Martha Cogdill at 336-688-3105.

Ongoing

• 6 to 8 p.m., Abstract Church, 1785 N. Bridge St., Elkin, hosts Kitchen 9:13, a free community meal for everyone, each second Monday of the month.

• 5 p.m., Christ Lutheran Church has a free community meal on the fourth Monday of each month at 451 Winston Road, Jonesville.

• 7 p.m., Abstract Church, 1785 N. Bridge St., Elkin, hosts Celebrate Recovering, a ministry designed to help hurting people, each Saturday. Trained leaders provide safe, confidential, Christ-centered groups where people can seek recovery and gain healing from life’s hurts, habits and hang-ups. The group is free. For more information, visit abstractchurch.org.

Submission guidelines for calendar events: One-time events may be submitted for placement in the calendar at least two weeks prior to the date of the event. Information should include date, time, place, brief description and contact information, if necessary. Calendars are published as space permits and do not run in every issue of the paper. If your submission is not showing, it is due to the chronological order of the events. Events to be included are at our discretion, and information is subject to editing. Send events to [email protected]

Local sports briefs

First Posted: 1:57 am - May 23rd, 2016

Staff Report



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MAY EVENTS

Wilkes Chamber Foundation Golf Tournament

WILKESBORO — The Wilkes Chamber Foundation will host a golf tournament on May 26. Tee-off is set for 1 p.m. with registration and lunch starting at 11:30 a.m. The tournament will take place at Oakwoods Country Club, located at 541 Clubhouse Road, Wilkesboro. Lunch and goody bags will be given out to all eligible players. Rain date is May 31. To download the registration form, go to chambermaster.blob.core.windows.net/userfiles/UserFiles/chambers/334/File/Dana/2016GolfTournament.jpg.

JUNE EVENTS

Volleyball camp slated for Yadkin County

BOONVILLE — Catawba Volleyball Coach Ginger Hamric will be hosting a volleyball camp at the Family Life Center at Richmond Hill Baptist Church on June 6 and 7. The camp will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day. Participants are asked to bring their own lunch. The camp is for rising fourth- to ninth-graders. To register for the camp, participants can show up at the Family Life Center on June 6 at 8:30 a.m. All participants are asked to make a donation to the Richmond Hill Building Fund in place of a registration fee.

East Wilkes Junior Cardinal Football Camp

RONDA — East Wilkes High School will hold its fourth annual Junior Cardinal Football Camp June 8-10. The camp will be held on the campus of East Wilkes High School and run from 9 a.m. to noon each day. Early registration is encouraged but walk-up registrations will be accepted on June 8. Walk-up registration begins at 8 a.m. on June 8. The camp is run by the East Wilkes coaching staff and players. Each camper will learn the basics and fundamentals of each position including stance, footwork, and position specific drills. Cost of the camp is $40. Contact East Wilkes High School with any questions at 336-651-7200.

Lady Cards hosting basketball camp

RONDA — The East Wilkes Lady Cardinals are holding a basketball camp June 13-15. Girls ranging from third grade to ninth grade are eligible to attend. The camp will take place in the East Wilkes High School gym. The purpose of the camp is to improve basketball skills in a fun environment. Those attending should bring basketball shoes, gym shorts, T-shirts and a great attitude, according to organizers. The camp will be held daily from 9 a.m. to noon, and cost is $45. Registration forms can be picked up at East Wilkes High School. For more information or concerns, contact Coach Campbell at 336-651-7200 or [email protected]

2016 Blue Ridge Basketball School

DOBSON — East Wilkes head basketball coach, Brad Davis, will be hosting a basketball camp at Surry Community College June 13-6. The camp will be for boys and girls, rising third through ninth grades. The camp runs from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The cost of the camp is $100. More information can be found at blueridgebasketball.com.

Youth soccer camp at Forbush High School

EAST BEND — Forbush High school’s soccer program will be hosting a summer skills soccer camp on June 20-23. The camp is available for youth soccer player ranging in age from 7 through 13 years. Forbush Coach Seth Davis, and Guilford College starting defender Robert Cornelius will be the instructors for the camp. Cost for the camp is $50. Each player will receive a soccer ball and a T-shirt. Participants are asked to contact Seth Davis at 336-469-0240 or [email protected] with any questions.

Basketball skills clinic scheduled

BOONVILLE — The Yadkin Valley Basketball Academy and Starmount Basketball will host an Ultimate Skills Clinic on June 27 and 28 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. for rising fourth- through 12th-graders. The cost of the camp is $55. Campers who register and pay by May 27 will receive a free basketball. Yadkin Valley Basketball Academy (YVBA) was created to give players the tools they need to become better basketball players. Using the skills and drills from today’s ELITE high school, NCAA and NBA players. YVBA also offers 1-on-1 and Small Group training sessions with gym locations in Surry and Yadkin counties. For information about camp and how to register, visit www.YadkinBball.com or email [email protected]

Staff Report

Farewell, sweet Myrtle, farewell

First Posted: 12:49 am - May 23rd, 2016

By Stephen Harris - For The Tribune



Stephen Harris Back In The Hometown
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NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. — The year was 1960. Mom told me that during the Chatham summer vacation week we were going to the beach. What’s a beach, I thought. I was 4 years old.

We’d have to pack up some clothes, she said, and we’d have to leave very early. Mom wondered aloud what to do for breakfast on the road. They’d never had to pack a kid for a trip before.

In the dead of night she spread a blanket for me in the Chevy’s back seat and encouraged me to go to sleep. Not much chance of that, not with the start of my first big adventure.

It didn’t take me long to take to the beach. I loved the water and more play sand than I had ever seen in my short life and the colorful and noisy carnival across from the old Myrtle Beach Pavilion. What a time, what a trip.

Now, as the sun rises over the Cherry Grove pier, I’m back on the beach, one last time. Happy memories parade across my mind. From 1960 to age 60, I’ve come to a bittersweet moment. I confront my age and the thought that this is my last trip here. I have no plans or inclination to come back.

I chuckle at the stony silence after I told a couple of the kids a few days prior that we were coming here. I don’t know if it was because the beach is for young folks only, or if we aren’t supposed to be off like this alone, or if the kids were waiting to be invited along. They’ll get over it.

Mom and Dad spent their honeymoon here. Only after their passing did I note on their marriage license that they got married in York County, S.C., on their way here. Not until that moment did I realize that they had eloped. No wonder they loved this place.

On the way down here I stopped along Highway 21 in York County to fill up with cheap South Carolina gas. As I pumped I almost could see Dad and Mom in his old, black, ‘52 Chevy rushing down the highway.

Nothing remains here from the days of my youth except Peaches Corner. And a new facade that does not have the Reeves Theater-like, flashing lights makes the corner look different, makes me feel out of place.

Back home much remains the same. The home place, downtown Elkin and State Road, and many but not all of the people remain.

But here the beach town is so transient. You come and go on visits, the beach buildings come and go, the attractions come and go. Each time I came back here I noted something that had been torn down or converted in my absence. In good time I’ll pass on as well.

I still feel a punch in the gut when I pass the empty, grassed lot that once held the Pavilion. I replay in my mind the poignant Kenny Chesney music video, “Anything But Mine,” filmed at the Pavilion just three years before its demolition in ‘07.

I came here several times as a kid, then did not come as a teenager. I still grin when I remember the summer when I signed up to work at the mill during Chatham vacation week, then Mom and Dad took advantage and up and ran away for a week here, leaving me back in the hometown.

After my teen absence I came back here in my mid-20s for a weekend outdoor concert. On the way out we stopped by the Pavilion for a half-hour on a sunny Sunday afternoon and stood at the boardwalk guardrail. I mourned my teen years that knew no beach.

I was in my mid-30s when I took my first motorcycle trip here and cruised Ocean Boulevard, wearing no helmet on the streets for the first time and feeling the wind in my hair. (You could do that then but not now.) I was too old to feel young and too young to feel old.

Other firsts here: roller coaster ride, dipped ice cream cone, batting cage swings, buying a gold necklace for a girl.

And dozens of other memories parade by.

You always remember your first love. Nothing else ever makes you feel quite the same. I’m a lucky guy to be able to linger here one final time at ocean’s edge and savor the first-love charm of this place that feels so magical for me and for many of you.

Stephen Harris returned home to live in State Road.

Stephen Harris Back In The Hometown
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_harrismug-3.jpgStephen Harris Back In The Hometown

By Stephen Harris

For The Tribune

Auction raises money for foundation

First Posted: 7:31 pm - May 22nd, 2016

By Troy Brooks - [email protected]



Melissa Wall, Tabitha Kelly, and Beth Deluca of the Golden Living in Mount Airy enjoying the chance to mingle with local medical professionals.
Troy Brooks | The Tribune
Guests check out the lots for the silent auction.
Troy Brooks | Elkin Tribune
Larry Irwin and the Elkin Big Band starting the night off with old fashioned swing tunes.
Troy Brooks | The Tribune
Lot Number 9; a solid wood cherry chest of drawers donated by Vaughan Bassett Crafters of Fine Home Furnishings.
Troy Brooks | Elkin Tribune
The wine auction is a time to catch up with friends and family while partaking in a fundraiser for the Hugh Chatham Memorial Hospital Foundation.
Troy Brooks | The Tribune
Guests arrive and sign in for the auction.
Troy Brooks | The Tribune
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Elkin — Friday’s 14th annual wine auction was the kickoff to the Yadkin Valley Wine Festival but it was also an important fundraising project for the Hugh Chatham Memorial Hospital Foundation.

The festival started at 6 p.m. Friday night and went on throughout the evening, treating local residents to a night of great food, banter, music and the chance to raise money for the hospital foundation.

“The wine festival started 15 years ago to help promote this area as a destination of wine vineyards and I think we have really set us apart as one of the premiere wine events in North Carolina,” said Master of Ceremonies Jeff Eidson. “This auction not only gives us a chance to raise money for a good cause but also to dress up and celebrate what we are as a community.”

Guests got to enjoy hors d’oeuvres and music from three bands throughout the night; the Elkin Big Band directed by Larry Irwin, the Luke Mears Band, and the Jerry Chapman band. Bidders got to bid on items and trips through both live and silent auctions. The live auction took place off-and-on throughout the night and was hosted by auctioneer Ricky Higgins. All of the items were donated primarily by local people and affiliates but items from outside Surry County were also presented to guests. A solid wood cherry chest of drawers, a Jacqueline Kennedy collection necklace, a trip to Deerfield Plantation in Surfide Beach, South Carolina, and even six tickets to the Carolina Panthers vs. Pittsburgh Steelers preseason game were just a few of the lots presented during the auction. A draw-down also occurred giving people a chance to win anything from four Subway sandwiches to the grand prize of a four-day, three-night Caribbean Cruise.

“I think everybody’s having a good time. The bids might be a bit higher this year,” said guest J.L. Lowe.

While the auction was an integral part of the evening, for many, the chance to catch up with friends and family was the highlight for many guests.

“The event’s been really fun. It’s a good way to promote the hospital and to help make money for things they need around the community. It’s nice for everyone to get together and have a fun night, get dressed up, go out, leave the kids at home and just unwind,” said hospital intern Carolyn Blackburn. “It’s my second time presenting for the auction. My mom works for the hospital and they had an opening and asked me if I wanted to do it and I said yes. It’s really fun. I really liked presenting three-strand pearls. They were so pretty.”

For nurse Melissa Wall, it was an opportunity to not only mingle with friends but also meet other medical professionals.

“This is my first year attending this event. It’s a great chance to get to know other hospitals and facilities and network together with people,” said Melissa Wall of Golden Living Center from Mount Airy. “What I really appreciate is that it’s a charity and a chance for us to get to know each other not just as professionals but as people. Just to see the camaraderie and the amount of participation and donations has astounded me and it’s not just Elkin locals making donations; it’s other venues from outside this local area coming together for a good cause. I was surprised by the Panther’s tickets and the getaway to Williamsburg. I bid $700 one of the lots. I didn’t get it but it’s just seeing how people care and how much participation there has been for this cause is outstanding.”

This year, the hospital foundation’s goal was to raise $60,000 to place 30 =automated external AED automated defibrillators in churches and non-profit organization throughout Alleghany, Surry, Wilkes, and Yadkin counties.

“These defibrillators could save someone’s life,” said Vicki Holcomb Clark, executive director of Hugh Chatham. “Anyone could have an attack and it just might be what they need to get their heart back in rhythm. With so many of these public places away from medical centers, some people may not have time to get the care they need to survive.”

Jane Hazelman believes that the wine auction is not just a great social event but a great demonstration of the community’s support for the hospital and the spirit of the people living here.

“The hospital is our community at its best,” Jane Hazelman. “Hospitals have been important to our country for 200 years and the spirit of our community is about helping and reaching out to others. It’s a small hospital but we want it to be the best hospital. Everyone supports it.”

Troy Brooks may be reached at 336-258-4058.

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0691.jpg

Melissa Wall, Tabitha Kelly, and Beth Deluca of the Golden Living in Mount Airy enjoying the chance to mingle with local medical professionals.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0694.jpgMelissa Wall, Tabitha Kelly, and Beth Deluca of the Golden Living in Mount Airy enjoying the chance to mingle with local medical professionals. Troy Brooks | The Tribune

Guests check out the lots for the silent auction.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0697.jpgGuests check out the lots for the silent auction. Troy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0674.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0665.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0645.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0644.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0652.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

Larry Irwin and the Elkin Big Band starting the night off with old fashioned swing tunes.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0643.jpgLarry Irwin and the Elkin Big Band starting the night off with old fashioned swing tunes. Troy Brooks | The Tribune

Lot Number 9; a solid wood cherry chest of drawers donated by Vaughan Bassett Crafters of Fine Home Furnishings.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0641.jpgLot Number 9; a solid wood cherry chest of drawers donated by Vaughan Bassett Crafters of Fine Home Furnishings. Troy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0640.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0655.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0635.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0647.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

The wine auction is a time to catch up with friends and family while partaking in a fundraiser for the Hugh Chatham Memorial Hospital Foundation.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0656.jpgThe wine auction is a time to catch up with friends and family while partaking in a fundraiser for the Hugh Chatham Memorial Hospital Foundation. Troy Brooks | The Tribune

Guests arrive and sign in for the auction.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0660.jpgGuests arrive and sign in for the auction. Troy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0664.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0679.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune

By Troy Brooks

[email protected]

Park packed for Yadkin Wine Festival

First Posted: 6:38 pm - May 22nd, 2016

By Troy Brooks - [email protected]



Kasi and Derek Brown’s Little Blue Photo Bus known as Caroline. Born in 1974, this little photo booth gave people the chance to take two strips of photo for $5.
Troy Brooks | The Tribune
Wine Maker Timothy Wahl of Adagio Winery treating a guest to one of his many mixes.
Troy Brooks | The Tribune
Robert Hein of Crispin’ Kettle Corn mixing a huge batch of kettle corn.
Troy Brooks | The Tribune
Gary Maxey wonders the festival dressed up as the bumbling Roman god of wine, Bacchus
Troy Brooks | The Tribune
Jo Drewery’s jewelry stand, one of many crafting booths at the Yadkin Valley Wine Festival.
Troy Brooks | The Tribune
David and Nancy Calkins from Greensboro dancing together to old Elvis Tunes by the Taylor Vaden’s Tribute band. “We just got here about ten minutes ago. First thing we heard the music and ran over and started dancing.”
Troy Brooks | Elkin Tribune
Kids racing in the grape stomp to see who can fill their jar up the fastest.
Troy Brooks | The Tribune
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ELKIN — The 15th Annual Wine Festival has come to a close and the turnout was anything but stale. Guests were rolling into Elkin Municipal Park well before the festivities started around 11 a.m. and soon the grounds was mobbed with people from both inside and outside of Surry County eager to get a taste of the Yadkin Valley Vineyards.

“We’ve been here since the festival’s beginning,” said Steven Mchone, head wine maker of RagApple Lassie Vineyards. “To me this is one of the best ones in the state. Wide open, big setup, lots of people here and plenty of room. My favorite thing is the people. We get great feedback from all over the state.”

“I’ll admit, I was a little bit worried about the weather for today. There’s always a chance of thunderstorms this time of the year. I think the festival is doing so well thanks to the gorgeous weather we’ve ended up having today.”

The festival started 15 years ago when members of the chamber of commerce wanted to do a celebration that would showcase Yadkin Valley’s wineries, promote the public, and bring attention to the valley. During the day, two bands performed on stage. First guests were taken back in time to the days of the ‘King of Rock and Roll’ with Taylor Vaden’s Tribute to Elvis from noon to 2 p.m. After that, headliner Phatt City treated the audience to old time beach music, R&B and dance music. Throughout the day, Baccuhs, the Roman God of Wine and Agriculture, hobbled through the park with his goblet.

“While exploring other festivals to see how they did it, they said you’ve got to have a Bacchus,” said local resident Gary Maxey, dressed up as Bacchus. “They asked ‘where do I find a Bacchus’ and they said just find a fat guy with a beard. I’ve been playing the part ever since and I enjoy it, especially just getting to meet people throughout the day.”

At around 2 p.m., people went in front of the stage for one of the festival’s traditions, the annual grape stomp. People of all ages, from young kids to adults in their 50s were racing to see who could stomp the most grapes and fill their jar up the fastest.

”It’s my 15th year sponsoring the grape stomp,” said Gambill Aldridge of Basin Creek Reality. “They ask me to do it 15 years ago and after figuring out a way to do it we’ve been sponsoring it ever since. Everybody gets excited for it. I think the ‘I Love Lucy’ show is a good reason why it’s so popular. It also gives something for kids to do as there really aren’t that many activities for them.”

For many new vineyards, it’s an opportunity to come out and promote their wines to the public.

“It’s been really busy this year,” said Jan Wahl, owner of Adagio Winery in Elkin. “Our business has only been here a couple years so this has been a great way to spread the word. The first time we participated we came to the festival two weeks after we opened our business and we only had three wines to promote. Now it’s three years later and that number’s gone up to eight. The festival has played a huge part in our expansion and we always try to come back when we can.”

Wine was not the only commodity people could indulge in. The smell of sizzling Italian sausage and gyros filled the air during lunchtime and in the hot sun, many guests treated themselves to an ice cream cone. This was Crispin Kettle Corn’s third year of participating in the festival and their huge kettle was popping all day.

“We’ve checked into a lot of different wine festivals but we love how they’ve treated the vendors here and the way they put on the event,” said Kiera Hein of Crispin Kettle Corn with her husband Robert Hein. “One thing that keeps drawing us back is the impressive job the chamber has done in arranging this event. They go around every single vendor and give them free wine glasses and a wrist band and they let them go out and try any wine they want during or after the festival. It’s great that we can be a part of it. Plus it allows us to tell customers what we’ve discovered during our stay. That’s really cool and not a lot of events will do that.”

The festival is also an opportunity for local artists and craftsmen to come out. Jewelers, potters, weavers, and woodcutters all set up shop along the creek to showcase their work.

“It’s been a great festival.” said Jo Drewery of BeadJeweled Designs. “The people are great, the music’s fantastic, it’s just a great event to be at. It’s also a good time for crafts because a lot of people like something’s that’s original that they won’t see anywhere else. We’ve been selling all kinds of jewelry, crystals, glassware, beads, and precious stones. We incorporate theme earrings and necklaces, including wine bottle themes to keep with the festival’s mood.”

One festival invention that kept people interested was Tracey Luebber’s Swankey. Part wine cooler, part bag, her little stand caught the attention of many guests with her portable summer wine carrier.

“The invention came out of necessity,” said Tracey Luebbers, inventor and owner of The Swankey Beverage Tote. “I was inspired to make it while going to swimming pools and watching friends find ways to carry beverages, especially box and bottle wines. I imagined a beach bag that was also a cooler. This is our first time here for the festival and we love it. It’s always fun to see people react to the product and the atmosphere.”

The festival isn’t just a time for local residents to get together, it’s a place of destination for wine lovers from across the country. People were coming from the tip of Florida and even the Northern states to try out the Yadkin Valley’s many wineries and vineyards.

The weather managed to hold off for the most part Saturday. Festival goers got to enjoy a beautiful day until about 3 p.m. when the first raindrops started coming down. A thunderstorm rolled in about four just as most people were heading out. Still, it was nice of the weather to hold off for the majority of the festival. Despite the thunderous ending, it was a fantastic day for many guests who are looking forward to the next festival.

“We just came up here for one of my best friend’s graduation parties,” said Sandra, Abigail and Brittany Strickland from Fayetteville, North Carolina. “We found out this was going on so we said ‘hey, let’s go to the festival!’ We’ve loved it so far and if we get a chance to come back we definately will.”

Troy Brooks may be reached at 336-258-4058.

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http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0744.jpg

Kasi and Derek Brown’s Little Blue Photo Bus known as Caroline. Born in 1974, this little photo booth gave people the chance to take two strips of photo for $5.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0746.jpgKasi and Derek Brown’s Little Blue Photo Bus known as Caroline. Born in 1974, this little photo booth gave people the chance to take two strips of photo for $5. Troy Brooks | The Tribune

Wine Maker Timothy Wahl of Adagio Winery treating a guest to one of his many mixes.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0749.jpgWine Maker Timothy Wahl of Adagio Winery treating a guest to one of his many mixes. Troy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0756.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0757.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0737.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune

Robert Hein of Crispin’ Kettle Corn mixing a huge batch of kettle corn.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0724.jpgRobert Hein of Crispin’ Kettle Corn mixing a huge batch of kettle corn. Troy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0727.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0729.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0730.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0706.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune

Gary Maxey wonders the festival dressed up as the bumbling Roman god of wine, Bacchus
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0711.jpgGary Maxey wonders the festival dressed up as the bumbling Roman god of wine, Bacchus Troy Brooks | The Tribune

Tracey Luebber’s invention “The Swankey,” a portable bag and wine cooler.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0720.jpgTracey Luebber’s invention “The Swankey,” a portable bag and wine cooler. Troy Brooks | The Tribune Troy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0703.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune Troy Brooks | The Tribune

Jo Drewery’s jewelry stand, one of many crafting booths at the Yadkin Valley Wine Festival.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0766.jpgJo Drewery’s jewelry stand, one of many crafting booths at the Yadkin Valley Wine Festival. Troy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0768.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune

David and Nancy Calkins from Greensboro dancing together to old Elvis Tunes by the Taylor Vaden’s Tribute band. “We just got here about ten minutes ago. First thing we heard the music and ran over and started dancing.”
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0777.jpgDavid and Nancy Calkins from Greensboro dancing together to old Elvis Tunes by the Taylor Vaden’s Tribute band. “We just got here about ten minutes ago. First thing we heard the music and ran over and started dancing.” Troy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0789.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0798.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0769.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0772.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0814.jpgTroy Brooks | Elkin Tribune

Kids racing in the grape stomp to see who can fill their jar up the fastest.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0817.jpgKids racing in the grape stomp to see who can fill their jar up the fastest. Troy Brooks | The Tribune

http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_0799.jpgTroy Brooks | The Tribune

By Troy Brooks

[email protected]

MVAC men’s track awards named

First Posted: 3:02 pm - May 22nd, 2016

Staff Report



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The MVAC released its all conference and honorable mentions for the 2016 men’s track season. Tyler Hanks from Alleghany was voted Player of the Year along with Trey Lomax from Starmount. Coach of the Year was Alex Rollins from Ashe.

Starmount athletes to achieve All Conference along with Lomax are Brendan Eads, Logan Styers, and Brandon Prescott. Elkin All Conference athletes are Charles Walker, Jacob Parker, Chris Lomax, and Jonah Christian. While Spencer Kranz from East Wilkes also received All Conference.

Other athletes who achieved All Conference are Hunter Argetsinger (Ashe), Andrew Bynum (Wilkes Central), Grant Cowles (Wilkes Central), Jason Durr (Ashe), Matt Greer (Ashe), Dalton Hall (North Wilkes), Joshua Hall (West Wilkes), Tyler Hanks (Alleghany), Sam Hurdler (Ashe), Nick Lanfrachi (Ashe), Lenny Lopez (West Wilkes), Daniel McNeil (West Wilkes), Victor Melo (Ashe), JK Miles (North Wilkes), Luke Miles (North Wilkes), Brandon Miller (West Wilkes), Jonathan Osborne (West Wilkes), Luis Ramos (Ashe), Devon Redman (Wilkes Central), Kyle Rhodes (East Wilkes), Alex Richardson (Ashe), Riley Richardson (Ashe), Nate Robinson (West Wilkes), Cory Sidden (North Wilkes), Jacob Smithey (North Wilkes), Andrew Tedder (Ashe), Wes Waddell (Ashe), Kameron Walsh (North Wilkes), Cedric White (North Wilkes), and Haven Winebarger (North Wilkes).

Honorable Mention includes Louis Aquino (East Wilkes), Terek Ashley (Ashe), Tafton Baker (Ashe), Gareth Berry (Ashe), Andrew Bynum (Wilkes Central), Kendron Carlton (Wilkes Central), Jonah Christian (Elkin), Hunter Cleary (East Wilkes), Madison Dunn (Wilkes Central), Austin Gregory (East Wilkes), Spencer Kranz (East Wilkes), Brandon Loredo (Elkin), Victor Melo (Ashe), Weston Miller (East Wilkes), Billy Mullis (East Wilkes), Justin Parsons (Wilkes Central), Brandon Prescott (Starmount), Damien Reed (East Wilkes), Billy Reyna (Ashe), Alex Richardson (Ashe), Alex Royal (East Wilkes), Jared Serbeck (West Wilkes), Luke Sheets (West Wilkes), Jake Shepherd (Ashe), Andrew Tedder (Ashe), and Cedric White (North Wilkes).

Staff Report

NCHSAA playoff results

First Posted: 2:54 pm - May 22nd, 2016

By Kristian Russell - [email protected]



Charly McCormick takes a free kick for the Falcons earlier this season.
Allen Davis | InAction Photography
Brook Gammons finds the rebound off of the goal post to score a goal for the Falcons earlier this season.
Allen Davis | InAction Photography
Forbush softball player Alex Wingler lays down a bunt earlier this season for the Falcons.
Allen Davis | InAction Photography
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EAST BEND — With the NCHSAA playoffs heading to the fourth round, only Forbush soccer and Forbush softball remain in the tournament from the local squads. This past weekend, the Falcons battled their way to the Regional Championship. Results from the games are as follows.

Softball:

Forbush vs. West Wilkes — Second-ranked Forbush Falcons beat West Wilkes, 4-0, in the 2A quarterfinals on Friday night. Marissa Lineberry had an outstanding game as she drove in two runs in the first inning, then hit a home run to seal the deal for the Falcons. Forbush will move on to the best-of-three semifinals where they will take on either West Lincoln or Brevard (who will play Monday night due to rain).

Soccer:

Forbush vs. East Lincoln — Due to a heavy down pour on Saturday night, the game has been moved to Monday night. Kick off is set for 6.

Charly McCormick takes a free kick for the Falcons earlier this season.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Charly.jpegCharly McCormick takes a free kick for the Falcons earlier this season. Allen Davis | InAction Photography

Brook Gammons finds the rebound off of the goal post to score a goal for the Falcons earlier this season.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Brooke.jpegBrook Gammons finds the rebound off of the goal post to score a goal for the Falcons earlier this season. Allen Davis | InAction Photography

Forbush softball player Alex Wingler lays down a bunt earlier this season for the Falcons.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Wingler.jpegForbush softball player Alex Wingler lays down a bunt earlier this season for the Falcons. Allen Davis | InAction Photography

By Kristian Russell

[email protected]

MVAC soccer awards announced

First Posted: 2:49 pm - May 22nd, 2016

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All conference and honorable mention for the MVAC was released on Thursday afternoon. Several players from Elkin, East Wilkes and Starmount made the list, while the 2016 Player and Coach of the Year are both from Ashe County. Player of the Year was Mahala Land (Ashe County), and Coach of the Year was Wes Rousseau (Ashe County).

All Conference from Elkin are Abbie Flores and Mattie Timmerman. Honorable Mention from Elkin are Allie Lovett and Lindsey Shinkle.

All Conference from Starmount includes Diana Flores, Courtney Byrd, Amber Hurst and Claire Maske. Honorable Mention from Starmount are Maggie Freed and Isabel Najera.

All Conference from East Wilkes are Melia Higgins, Ciara Pierce and Brooke Schubart. Honorable Mention from East Wilkes are Shelia Aquilar and Anna Parks.

Other All Conference players include Ayla Albert (West Wilkes), Karson Anderson (Wilkes Central), Brooke Bentley (Wilkes Central), Beckah Bowers (Ashe), Cassie Burdiss (West Wilkes), Emily Hill (North Wilkes), Valerie Keys (Ashe), Mahala Land (Ashe), Amanda Limon (West Wilkes),Sierra Massucco (Wilkes Central), Alyssa Peterson (Ashe) Melissa Ramos (Ashe), Holly Swofford (Wilkes Central).

Honorable Mention includes Candance Bell (North Wilkes), Sierra Deloach (Alleghany), Abby Dawson (West Wilkes), Rianna Evans (Alleghany), Natalie Harless (Ashe), Elizabeth Huffman (West Wilkes), Molly Kolstad (Wilkes Central), Sarah Mizelle (Wilkes Central), Shauna Saunders (North Wilkes), and Bennett Watson (Ashe).

Staff Report

Dog rescued from sinking truck

First Posted: 6:12 pm - May 21st, 2016

By Troy Brooks - [email protected]



Tim Bennett’s truck is completely submerged by the time Bennett got out there to rescue the dog.
Photo courtsey of Tim Bennett
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NORTH WILKESBORO — A harrowing rescue took place Tuesday morning off of Hwy. 115 in North Wilkesboro when Tim Bennett rescued his dog Maggie after she drove the truck into a nearby pond. The rescue happened that morning when Tim and Maggie, a one-and-a-half-year-old pit-boxer mix, were visiting Bennett’s parents.

“It just started as a usual Tuesday morning for us,” said Bennett. “Our daily morning routine always included a handful of snacks for Maggie from my dad. I was inside the house talking on the phone to my mother-in-law and luckily had a ‘beep.’ It was my parents’ neighbor yelling that my truck was in the pond!”

According to Bennett, Maggie is a very hyper dog and the young boxer had accidentally knocked the truck out of gear, sending the vehicle rolling down the hill and into the pond. By the time Bennett got outside, the truck already was submerged in the middle of the pond with the dog inside.

“The windows in my truck were up high enough so she couldn’t jump out. I ran as fast as I could and dove into the pond — clothes and all. I swam to the truck and noticed her nose sticking out of the window. The door would not open and thank God I left the window down far enough to reach inside and roll the window down manually. She swam out coughing and wheezing but all was well. Except for the truck of course.”

Bennett doubted his truck can be fixed, but he’s glad he and Maggie got out fine.

Troy Brooks may be reached at 336-258-4058.

Tim Bennett’s truck is completely submerged by the time Bennett got out there to rescue the dog.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_IMG_4953.jpgTim Bennett’s truck is completely submerged by the time Bennett got out there to rescue the dog. Photo courtsey of Tim Bennett

By Troy Brooks

[email protected]

Foothills Arts Council news and upcoming events

First Posted: 2:30 pm - May 21st, 2016 Updated: 2:30 pm - May 21st, 2016.

Staff Report



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ELKIN — The Annual Meeting of the Foothills Arts Council will be at 7 p.m. on June 20. All members and the community is invited to attend. New board members will be voted on and the new budget approved.

The Foothills Arts Council is appreciative of the support by the town of Elkin, Surry County, the Winston-Salem Foundation and its business and individual sponsors.

“Without that support, the arts council’s programming and presence would diminish greatly,” said Director Leighanne Martin Wright. “If you receive a letter asking you to be a member, we hope you will see the value in our contributions to the community and become a member for this next fiscal year.”

Summertime is right around the corner and the Foothills Arts Council, 129 Church St., Elkin, has several events to fill these warm days with art and fun, Wright said.

The annual Summer Eve Garden Gala will be from 7 to 9:30 p.m. on June 17 with live music by the Easy Street Brothers (the four-piece jazz quartet back by popular demand from last December’s Open Air Art Market!), plenty of food with Elkin Creek Vineyards on hand with its great wine.

“The party is our thank you to our members and the community and is free,” Wright added.

“We will also have a gallery opening that evening of ‘Off’ Main Street. This exhibit will include art and photography of local and regional artists showing us their unique views of small town life. The exhibit is an open call and submissions can be brought to the arts council from 1:30 to 6:30p.m. on Monday, June 6 and Wednesday, June 8. If chosen to hang in the exhibit the art will be on display for four weeks. For more information, see our website, www.foothillsartscouncil.org.”

“In July, we have plenty of art for the kids starting off with the annual KidsFest on Saturday, July 9. Art activities, live music, food, games, a bouncy house and a water slide all await area children from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. And all free of charge! KidsFest is funded in part by a grant from the Yadkin Valley United Fund.

“Also in July we will have a Summer Art Camp from July 18-21 with three sessions per day by age. Rising first and second-graders from 9 to 11 a.m.; third to fifth-graders from 1 to 3 p.m.; and sixth and up from 4 to 6 p.m. Students in the older grades will be working on a Kandinsky-style mural to be displayed in our garden. Tuition for the camp is $65 and will be taught by Jan Gillam, who now teaches our Art Quest and evening art classes.”

To keep up on all the upcoming events and the events of associate members, Foothills Theatre, Reevestock Music Festival, and the Elkin Valley Fiddlers, check out www.foothillsartscouncil.org and be sure to like their Facebook pages.

Staff Report

Ron Rash to read, sign books at Elkin Library

First Posted: 4:11 pm - May 20th, 2016

By Troy Brooks - [email protected]



Author Ron Rash will read his work at the Elkin Public Library Thursday.
Photo courtesy of Ulf Andersen
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Award-winning author and poet Ron Rash is coming down to the valley next week on Thursday to pay a visit to the Elkin Public Library for a day of reading and book signing. The reading will start at 7 p.m. and is free to the public.

“We’re very excited to have him visiting our library,” said Branch Librarian Martha Smith. “We wanted to get him to visit our library because he has a fairly big name among southern literature.”

Rash was born on Sept. 25, 1953, in Chester, South Carolina, and grew up in Boiling Springs. He graduated from Gardner-Webb University and Clemson University with B.A. and M.A. in English, respectively. Rash is most known for his short stories, but he also has written several novels and poetry.

Rash published his first book in 1994, a collection of short stories titled “The Night the New Jesus Fell to Earth.” He has also won several awards for his work, including the 2010 Frank O’ Connor International Short Story Award for his collection Burning Bright. He has written four prizewinning novels “The Cove,” “One Foot in Eden,” “Saints at the River” and “The World Made Straight.” He is also a two-time recipient of the O. Henry Prize. In 2003, Rash became a professor of Appalachian Studies at Western Carolina, returning to his family’s homeland in the mountains.

“We appreciate him being willing to take his time to come to a smaller town and audience,” said Smith. “We’re very close to where he set many of his stories in Western North Carolina. People who live here can actually feel the novels more accurately than people who live farther away from North Carolina and the mountains. They can identify with the character, the situations, and the setting very rapidly when they’re reading his work.”

Rash’s work focuses on dark, Appalachian themes, centered around people living in the Southern Appalachian area. He has written a wide of different genres. Many of his stories have a darker edge to them.

“We have a friend, Barbara Smith, who is an actress who performed one of Ron Rash’s stories at the high school,” said Ann Gulley of the library’s Board of Trustees. “The high school students made no noise at all during the performance. It was a very unusual thing. To use the cliché, you could hear a pin drop in that auditorium. There’s a bit of reality of the worlds and people he represents. He does have a reputation for being dark but several of his stories also have a tender, light touch.”

The event was made possible by members of the Library Board of Trustees who invited Rash to the library. The event is being funded by the Elkin Public Library Endowment. Many members of the Board of Trustees and the Elkin Library are excited for Rash’s visit next week.

“We have had a tradition at the library of bringing in Carolina writers like Lee Smith, Allan Gurganus and Dori Sanders,” said Gulley. “I think bringing in writers that have national reputation, whose names appear in The New York Times book reviews, is a really beneficial thing for the community because you don’t get that experience often in a small town. The other thing we’ve done is try to include high school students in these programs. You never know what the benefit will be, but I can’t help but think this will be something that will resonate at some point later in their lives.”

Troy Brooks may be reached at 336-258-4058.

Author Ron Rash will read his work at the Elkin Public Library Thursday.
http://elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_Ron-Rash_-Please-Credit-Ulf-Andersen.jpgAuthor Ron Rash will read his work at the Elkin Public Library Thursday. Photo courtesy of Ulf Andersen

By Troy Brooks

[email protected]

Elkin City Schools Career and Technical Education program seeks to continue its success

First Posted: 11:27 am - May 20th, 2016

By Wendy Byerly Wood - [email protected]



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While the Career and Technical Education programming in Elkin City Schools is among the strongest in the state, local school officials want to continue growing and strengthening the program going forward.

Elkin’s CTE department recently was the subject of an audit, which is being done in all of the state’s CTE programs over a seven-year period, according to Barbara Long, CTE director for ECS.

During a recent board of education meeting, Long took time to share the fall test results of the program’s students and the results of the audit.

“Last year we were third in the state among public schools, and in this report, we are a little higher than we were last year,” said Long.

In the most recent school-year information, she said 261 industry-recognized credentials had been earned by Elkin students, which was an increase from the previous year’s 168 credentials. These certifications range anywhere from Workforce Readiness Certification, which many industries are requiring before employment, to Microsoft Office Certification, ServSafe Certification for those working in the food industry, to Nurse Aide Certification and Adobe Visual Design Certifications.

“The percentage of credentials to CTE enrollment is 38 percent representing an increase from the previous year of 25.3 percent,” reported Long. “When they get out and apply for a job and they’ve got that certification, they have a better chance of getting hired.”

The CTE program also is seeing success in its graduation rate, Long said, as she reported those who concentrate on CTE focuses in high school are at a 98 percent graduation rate. And that is paying off following high school, “approximately 95 percent of former CTE concentrators, one year after graduating, were either employed (73.7 percent), and/or enrolled in the military (7.9 percent), and/or post-secondary education (57.9 percent),” she reported.

Elkin’s CTE program also is No. 1 in the state for nontraditional student enrollment, meaning the number of males taking courses such as foods I, and the number of females taking technology and building classes, Long said, noting, “We’re proud of that.”

Auditors had three findings of non-compliance issues, Long said, with those already being corrected. One of those was the lack of a needed license by the career development coordinator, which she said already has been remedied.

The other two findings were for coding something incorrectly when it was purchased and the other was making “minor” purchases, such as snacks, which weren’t allowable by the restricted funding source.

Several recommendations were made by auditors to improve the program, Long said. “We’ve already fixed the first one,” she said of being sure reports reflect the correct time periods during the year.

Of the second recommendation, to develop a written purchasing process, she already was working on that as well.

A third recommendation was to consider additional funding sources for things which aren’t allowed by CTE funding, such as the snacks. Long said fundraisers are being used to send students to national competitions during the summer, and local funds or other sources will have to be used for purchasing refreshments or other items not allowed.

Other recommendations included:

• ensuring information on CTE programs is up-to-date on the school website;

• considering adding honors courses for CTE to provide advanced learners with a more rigorous curriculum;

• ensuring Career and College Promise and Career Pathway information is provided within the Course Registration Guide to provide further opportunities for students;

• continuing to provide opportunities, such as tours, speakers and others, to CTE staff to learn more about local and regional business and industry.

Locally, Long said the CTE department, which includes 10 teachers, has developed a plan of what they would like to see for CTE in the future. Included in those items is offering more courses to Elkin City Schools’ students through Surry Community College; continuing to encourage students to focus on a career cluster with a completer or level II course even though it isn’t a requirement; and aligning the goals of workforce development, workforce education and economic development in the region to be sure the school system is meeting the needs of the business world.

Wendy Byerly Wood may be reached at 336-258-4035 or on Twitter @wendywoodeditor.

By Wendy Byerly Wood

[email protected]

Community Calendar

First Posted: 10:53 am - May 20th, 2016

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Submission guidelines for calendar events: One-time events may be submitted for placement in the calendar at least two weeks prior to the date of the event. Information should include date, time, place, brief description and contact information, if necessary. Calendars are published as space permits and do not run in every issue of the paper. If a submission is not showing, it is due to the chronological order of the events. Events to be included are at our discretion, and information is subject to editing. Send events to [email protected]

May 20

• 10 a.m. and 11 a.m., Elkin Public Library, 111 N. Front St., Elkin, will host Preschool Story Hour for 2 and 3 year olds at 10 and 3 and 4 year olds at 11 with the theme Sand & Sun. For more information, call 336-835-5586 or visit www.nwrl.org.

• 7 p.m., the Yadkin Valley Wine Auction and Gala will be held at The Liberty, 222 E. Main St., benefiting Hugh Chatham Memorial Hospital Foundation, with heavy hors d’oeuvres at 6 p.m. The auction and drawdown will be at 7 p.m., and there will be live entertainment.

May 21

• 8 a.m., the Yadkin Valley Tour de Vino bicycle ride will begin and end at Elkin High School, 334 Elk Spur St., Elkin, with four routes — 30.9 miles, 51.5 miles, 71.4 inches and 100.2 miles. Showers will be available after the ride, and those participating in the ride receive a tasting entry ticket to the Yadkin Valley Wine Festival, held the same day at Elkin Municipal Park. Registration fee for all rides is $35 per rider if paid before May 16 and includes refreshments, T-shirt, registration packet, complimentary entrance and wine tasting ticket to wine festival. Tours begin at 8 a.m. Bagels, fruits, juice and coffee will be served from 7 to 8 a.m., and refreshments will be available all day include a post-ride lunch. All riders must return to the high school by 3 p.m. Online registration is available at www.yvtdv.com.

• 8 a.m., the sixth annual Running the Vines at Shelton Vineyards will be held featuring a 5K, 10K and a half-mile kids fun run. Register online at sheltonvineyards5kand10k.itsyourrace.com or visit www.sheltonvineyards.com for more information. Bring a chair or blanket for the following “Afternoon Cool Down” event featuring live music by Mediocre Bad Gusy from noon to 2 p.m.

• 10 to 11:30 a.m., the Surry County Support Group for the Lupus Foundation of America will meet at the Mount Airy Public Library, 145 Rockford St., Mount Airy, iin the multipurpose room. The meeting is free, for more information, call 877-849-8271 ext. 2 or visit www.lupusnc.org.

• 11 a.m. until, Austin Fire and Rescue will host a BBQ chicken fundraiser with plates costing $8 and half chicken only for $4 at the Austin Fire Department, 7170 Austin-Traphill Road. For more information, call 336-957-2182.

• 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., the 15th annual Yadkin Valley Wine Festival will be held at Elkin Municipal Park featuring area wineries, food, entertainment and specialty vendors. For more information, call the Yadkin Valley Chamber at 336-526-1111 or visit www.yvuf.com.

• 11:30 a.m., the Yadkin Cultural Arts Center will host “Cinema Spectacular: The Avengers, A Superhero Extravaganza,” in the outdoor plaza with crafts and activities for kids of all ages and free snacks from the Third Branch Cafe while they last. A screening of the hit, “The Avengers,” will be shown in the Willingham Theater. Admission is free. For more information, call the arts center at 336-679-2941.

• 4 p.m., the Yadkin Valley Cruisers cruise-in will be held at the Yadkin Plaza Shopping Center. There will be music, door prizes and more. For more information, visit the Facebook page, Yadkin Valley Cruisers.

May 23

• 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., the Small Business Center of Surry Community College will offer “Business Structure” at The Center for Public Safety, 1220 S. State St., Mount Airy. The speaker will be attorney Robert Wall. The seminar will discuss the difference between a sole proprietor, partnership and corporation. It also will impress the importance of record keeping, and give an overview of tax responsibilities. To register for any Small Business Center seminars or view a complete listing of offerings, visit www.surry.edu/sbc. For more information, call 336-386-3685.

• 6:30 to 8 p.m., the Elkin Public Library will host Knit Nights at the library the fourth Monday of each month. It will be an evening for new and experienced knitters as well as those who crochet, stitch, sew and more, to knit, socialize and share tips and patterns. All levels are welcome. Beginning instruction can be provided for those who wish to learn. Bring a project to work on. No registration is required. For more information, contact Kasey Nowalk at 336-835-5586 or [email protected]

May 23-27

• The town of Jonesville will holds its annual spring clean up week. Items accepted include tires off the rim, rims can be picked up as metal, mattresses, appliances, furniture, carpet, computers, TVs, printers and electronics and more. Not accepted are paints, oils, chemicals, liquids of any kind, yard waste, wood, glass, car parts, cement, rocks, building material. This is for residential homes only, no businesses or apartments. All items should be placed at the edge of the grass, not in the street. For more information, call the town at 336-835-4068.

May 24

• 7 p.m., Austin Volunteer Fire Department will host a community meeting to discuss the fire tax rate at the station, 7170 Austin-Traphill Road, Elkin. Anyone who lives in and/or pays taxes in the Austin Fire District can attend. Refreshments will be provided following the meeting.

May 25

• Noon, Operation: GoodJobs is hosting a veteran hire fair from noon to 2 p.m., with the job fair open to the public from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Goodwill Career Connections, 1457 N. Bridge St., Elkin. For more information, call 336-786-4169 or 336-526-2144 or visit goodwillnwnc.org.

May 26

• 11:30 a.m., the Rotary Golf Tournament to benefit the Upper Yadkin Valley Habitat for Humanity will be held at Cedarbrook Country Club with buffet lunch at 11:30 a.m. and shotgun start at 1 p.m. It concludes with skill awards and door prizes. Cost is $50 per person. For more information, call Sam Wagoner at 336-466-2543.

• 5 to 7 p.m., the Small Business Center of Surry Community College will offer “Federal Contracting and SBA Programs/Services” at The Center for Public Safety, Room 111, 1220 S. State St., Mount Airy. Participants will find out how to access the federal marketplace and about federal certifications. Joe Ann Shaeffers will be the speaker. To register for any Small Business Center seminars or view a complete listing of offerings, visit www.surry.edu/sbc. For more information, call 336-386-3685.

May 26-28

• The Elkin VFW Post 7794 and Yadkin VFW Post 10346 will distribute Buddy Poppies at the Elkin Walmart, with members on site each day. Proceeds from donations accepted will be used to support veterans programs and other community groups and activities in the tri-country area.

May 28

• 9 a.m., Chatham Nursing & Rehabilitation will host the Duncan Dash, a family and pet-friendly fun fun/walk to raise awareness for the Alzheimer’s dementia population at Elkin Municipal Park, Elkin. Registration starts at 9 a.m. with a balloon send-off ceremony at 9:45 a.m. at the starting line. The walk begins at 10 a.m. There will be several items raffled off, a hot dog cookout for donations, a bouncy house, face painting and more. Registration is free, T-shirts are $10. The Alzheimer’s Association will receive at least 75 percent of the proceeds collected.

• 1 p.m., a special Memorial Day ceremony will be held on the courthouse lawn in Sparta, consisting of speakers from the VFW including State VFW Senior Vice Commander Doug Blevins, the American Legion, the Marine Corps League, and Mayor John Miller. The ceremony will conclude with the laying of the wreaths by the VFW and the Marine Corps League and featuring the honor guard of the VFW presenting a 21-gun salute and playing of “Taps.” At the conclusion of the ceremony, all military personnel will assemble at the north end of town for the Memorial Day Parade. To enter a vehicle or float, contact Thomas Owens at 336-657-1484.

• 5 p.m., Austin Fire and Rescue, 7170 Austin-Traphill Road, will host Bingo with food available at 5 p.m. and games starting at 6 p.m. Game cards cost 50 cents, $1 and $2. There will be prizes and 50/50 games. For more information, call 336-957-2182.

May 29

• 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., a blood drive will be held at Calvary Baptist Church, 314 S. Franklin Road, Mount Airy.

May 30

• 10 a.m., Captain Mark Garner Post 7794 Veterans of Foreign Wars will present the annual Memorial Day Ceremony honor the area’s fallen veterans at Elkin Municipal Park. This year’s featured speaker will be Elkin Mayor Lestine Hutchens. The program also will feature a presentation of colors and laying of the wreath by members of the Elkin High School Junior Army ROTC Unit. Due to limited seating, those attending are encouraged to bring lawn chairs.

• Noon to 4:30 p.m., a blood drive will be held at First United Methodist Church of Pilot Mountain, 210 Marion St., Pilot Mountain.

June 2

• 6:45 to 8 p.m., Elkin Public Library, 111 N. Front St., Elkin, will host Talkin Service, a reading and discussion program for veterans. The five-session book club will be led by Richard Hackler, a local veteran, pastor and Team Red White and Blue captain. The sessions will be May 19, June 2, June 16, June 30 and July 7. Books will be provided to all who participate in the free program, and refreshments will be provided. Sign up at the library front desk, call 336-835-5586 or email Kasey Nowalk at [email protected]

June 3

• 6 p.m. to midnight, the Relay for Life of Elkin will be held at Elkin Municipal Park. Teams may begin setting up tents at 4 p.m. and opening ceremony will be at 6 p.m. with survivor lap to follow at 6:20 p.m. The luminaria lighting will be at 9 p.m. Participants can register at www.relayforlife.org/elkinnc, and luminaries may be purchased online and will be available at the event. For more information, contact Melissa Hiatt at 336-755-8566.

June 4

• 1 p.m., a golf tournament fundraiser will be held at Silo Run Golf Course, 4040 Rockford Road, Boonville, to help pay the way for students at Rhythm on Main to go to Disney. Lunch and registration will begin at 1 p.m. Format is four-player captain’s choice, and there will be prizes for the top three teams, longest drive and closest to pin. Door prizes will be awarded as well. For more informatino, email [email protected]

June 7

• 8:30 a.m., the Yadkin Valley Senior Center will host a day trip to Shatley Springs. Cost is $13 for registered nutrition site participants, and $20 for nonregistered. Call the senior center at 336-526-1087 to sign up.

June 11

• The Foothills 5K WetRun will be held at Elkin Municipal Park featuring various water elements soaking runners and then ending the course with a large blow-up water slide. Following the race will be a concert by Christian artists Michael Tait with Newsboys. Medals will be given out following the race as well. Runners can register at the event, or in advance at foothillswetrun.com. Proceeds benefit CauseLife and will be used to build wells, providing clean water in third-world countries.

June 16

• 6:45 to 8 p.m., Elkin Public Library, 111 N. Front St., Elkin, will host Talkin Service, a reading and discussion program for veterans. The five-session book club will be led by Richard Hackler, a local veteran, pastor and Team Red White and Blue captain. The sessions will be May 19, June 2, June 16, June 30 and July 7. Books will be provided to all who participate in the free program, and refreshments will be provided. Sign up at the library front desk, call 336-835-5586 or email Kasey Nowalk at [email protected]

• 5:30 p.m., the annual Trails Boogie will be held at The Liberty, 222 E. Main St., Elkin, with social hour at 5:30 p.m and band starting at 7 p.m. Event is casual dress and admission is free, with donations providing funding for further trail progress accepted. The evening will include music from Doug Deming with Dennis Gruenling & The Jewel Tones, a silent auction, trails information, dinner buffet for purchase, and beverages.

June 18

• 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., the Surry County support group for the Lupus Foundation of America will be held at the Mount Airy Public Library, 145, Rockford St., Mount Airy, in the multipurpose room. For more information, call 877-849-8271 ext. 2 or visit www.lupusnc.org.

June 20

• 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., a quarterly veterans coffee will be held at Sagebrush Steakhouse, 2000 Woodland Drive, Mount Airy. The event is open to veterans of all ages and military services and provide an opportunity for local veterans to connect with other veterans, share stories and enjoy free coffee, doughnuts and conversation. Government and nonprofit organizations who provide support programs and activities for veterans are invited to attend the events to share information about their programs. For more information, call Don Timmons at 336-331-1309.

June 30

• 6:45 to 8 p.m., Elkin Public Library, 111 N. Front St., Elkin, will host Talkin Service, a reading and discussion program for veterans. The five-session book club will be led by Richard Hackler, a local veteran, pastor and Team Red White and Blue captain. The sessions will be May 19, June 2, June 16, June 30 and July 7. Books will be provided to all who participate in the free program, and refreshments will be provided. Sign up at the library front desk, call 336-835-5586 or email Kasey Nowalk at [email protected]

July 7

• 6:45 to 8 p.m., Elkin Public Library, 111 N. Front St., Elkin, will host Talkin Service, a reading and discussion program for veterans. The five-session book club will be led by Richard Hackler, a local veteran, pastor and Team Red White and Blue captain. The sessions will be May 19, June 2, June 16, June 30 and July 7. Books will be provided to all who participate in the free program, and refreshments will be provided. Sign up at the library front desk, call 336-835-5586 or email Kasey Nowalk at [email protected]

Sept. 19

• 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., a quarterly veterans coffee will be held at Sagebrush Steakhouse, 2000 Woodland Drive, Mount Airy. The event is open to veterans of all ages and military services and provide an opportunity for local veterans to connect with other veterans, share stories and enjoy free coffee, doughnuts and conversation. Government and nonprofit organizations who provide support programs and activities for veterans are invited to attend the events to share information about their programs. For more information, call Don Timmons at 336-331-1309.

Dec. 19

• 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., a quarterly veterans coffee will be held at Sagebrush Steakhouse, 2000 Woodland Drive, Mount Airy. The event is open to veterans of all ages and military services and provide an opportunity for local veterans to connect with other veterans, share stories and enjoy free coffee, doughnuts and conversation. Government and nonprofit organizations who provide support programs and activities for veterans are invited to attend the events to share information about their programs. For more information, call Don Timmons at 336-331-1309.

Ongoing

• 3 p.m., a community drum circle is held each Sunday at Central Park in King. No experience is necessary and extra drums are available for use. Weather updates and additional information can be found on Facebook at Pinnacle Drum Circle. For more information, email [email protected] or call 336-368-3866.

• 10 a.m., line dance class is being held each Monday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville, with Shirley Bell as instructor.

• 11 a.m., quilting class is being held each Monday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 5 to 8 p.m., clogging classes are being held every Monday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville, with beginners from 5 to 6 p.m., intermediate from 6 to 7 p.m. and team practice from 7 to 8 p.m. Cost is $20 per month and it’s open to those 10 and older. Call teacher Janice Nixon at 336-835-4912 to sign up.

• 6 to 8 p.m., each Monday, DivorceCare is a support group that meets at 147 Carter Mill Road, Elkin. The new session starts Feb. 8. It is designed for those hurting from the pain of separation and/or divorce. For more information, call Gwen at 336-244-4682.

• 10:30 a.m., exercise class is held each Tuesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., weaving class is held each Tuesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 5 p.m., the Yadkin Valley Senior Center will host Weight Watchers meetings.

• 6:30 p.m., Alanon Family Group meeting is held each Tuesday at First Baptist Church of Elkin’s Rectory. For more information, call 336-468-0395.

• 6:30 p.m., beginner shag 1 is held each Tuesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 7:45 p.m., beginner shag 2 is held each Tuesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 6 p.m., a monthly Alzheimer’s support group will be held every second Tuesday at Chatham Nursing & Rehab Center, 700 Johnson Ridge Road, Elkin. If area schools are closed due to inclement weather the group will not meet. For more information, call 336-567-7600.

• 7 p.m., the Stone Mountain chapter of Trout Unlimited meets the first Tuesday of each month at the Foothills Arts Council in downtown Elkin. For more information, visit www.smtu.org or the group’s Facebook page.

• 10 a.m., pickleball is held each Wednesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 10 a.m., bingo is held each Wednesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 12:30 p.m., prayer shawl group is held each Wednesday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• Noon to 1 p.m., the first Wednesday of each month, a free informational webinar is held for those interested in learning about the Guardian ad Litem program. These volunteers are court-appointed and serve as the judge’s eyes and ears on children going through the foster care system. To register or for more information, call Tammy Baity at 336-651-4465.

• 9 a.m., sewing is held each Thursday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 10 a.m., bingo is held each Thursday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 2 p.m., cards is held each Thursday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., Women In Sobriety, a new closed meeting, is held each Thursday at First Baptist Church of Elkin, 110 Gwyn Ave., Elkin. For more information, call Maureen at 336-258-2520.

• 6:30 to 8 p.m., 4G Club – Girls Growing in God’s Grace, is held each Thursday at the Fairfield Inn’s Conference Room in Elkin. It is a meeting for girls 13 to 25 to come together and bond. Regular rap sessions are held about depression, fear, anger, jealously and other topics the girls want to discuss. They will learn about talents and how to help others by using what each is already gifted with. For more information, call Christy Martin at 336-514-9452 or Joyce Martin at 336-258-2338.

• 5:30 p.m., the Jonesville Historical Society meets the third Thursday of each month at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center.

• 10 a.m., Tribune news is held each Thursday at the Yadkin Valley Senior Center, 121 Delos Martin Drive, Jonesville.

• 6 p.m., the Yadkin Valley Senior Center will host Art Party with Jan each first Friday of the month. The event is open to the public and cost of $35 includes all materials needed. Registration is required prior to the day of the art party by calling the center at 336-527-1087.

Area Alcoholics Anonymous meetings are held with the following schedule:

• 10:15 a.m., every Sunday at 218 Rockford St., Andy Griffith Playhouse downstairs, closed speaker discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., last Sunday of each month, at Mount Airy,(Granite City Group) Central United Methodist Church, North Main Street, closed discussion with an open speaker meeting. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Monday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group), 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, open speaker. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Monday in Mount Airy, (Mayberry Group) Old Train Depot, 580 Granite St., open speaker. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• Noon, every Tuesday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group), 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, open speaker. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 7 p.m., every Tuesday in Pilot Mountain (Pilot Mtn. Group), First United Methodist Church, N.C. 268 and Marion Street. Closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 7:30 p.m., every Tuesday at Yadkinville (Serenity Group) at Methodist Church, 204 W. Main St. Downstairs beneath old sanctuary, closed discussion with open speaker meeting last Tuesday of each month. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Tuesday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group) 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, Closed 12 & 12 study. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• Noon, every Wednesday, in Mount Airy (Primary Purpose), at First Presbyterian Church, 326 S. Main St., fellowship hall at corner of South Main and Church streets. Closed big book discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 7 p.m., every Wednesday, in Mount Airy (Mayberry Men’s Meeting), Rockford Street United Methodist Church, 520 Rockford St., closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Wednesday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group), 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, closed big book study. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Wednesday in Mount Airy, (Mayberry Group) Old Train Depot, 580 Granite St., closed big book study. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• Noon, every Thursday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group), 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 7:30 p.m., every Thursday at Yadkinville (Serenity Group) at Methodist Church, 204 W. Main St., downstairs beneath old sanctuary, closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Friday in Dobson (New Beginnings Group) at Dobson United Methodist Church, 204 S. Main St., building behind church, closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• 8 p.m., every Friday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group), 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, closed discussion. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

• Noon, every Saturday in Jonesville (Tri-County Group) 135 Bluff St., behind Starmount Crossing Shopping Center, N.C. 67, closed discussion.

• 8 p.m., every Saturday in Dobson (Hope Valley Meeting) at Hope Valley, Prison Camp Road, open speaker. For more information, call 336-386-8003.

Jonesville to apply for grant to replace old water lines

Town applying for funds to replace water lines

First Posted: 5:08 am - May 20th, 2016

By Troy Brooks - [email protected]



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JONESVILLE — Following Jonesville’s latest town council meeting, held May 9, many residents have been worried about the town’s water quality and the increasing costs of utilities.

The town staff is hopeful a grant will be awarded this fall to help replace much of the town’s old distribution system for Mineral Springs Drive, River Road, Cherry Street, and Cemetery Street.

“I never got a water bill when I lived in Elkin,” said Briarwood resident Lorraine Bensanti. “When I moved to Jonesville, the bill went to $38.50 for me and that price has been rising ever since. The water stinks. You can’t use it. I wouldn’t even let my dog drink that water. Prices are going up for everything these days and many people can afford these costs.

“We don’t mind paying for the water if the water is usable. Many people are sick enough as it is and we don’t need them getting worst due to bad water. If the water is not usable, then somebody’s not doing their job.”

Town Manager Scott Buffkin has stated that the water should still be safe to use.

“The water is aesthetically unpleasing but it’s not unsafe to consume,” said Buffkin. “I brought a drinking glass into the meeting the other night and filled it up at the water fountain here before the meeting started simply to demonstrate that this water comes out of the same water lines that come out of the same water plant that goes to everyone’s homes. We consume it daily. It’s not an unsafe thing. Still, it’s troubling to see people I know who are living on limited resources spending money on water from a store that’s no more clean and no more pure than what they are getting from their tap.”

Buffkin believes the current water rates are high enough to qualify for the Community Development Block grant they have applied for three times in the past six years and the town will be applying for the grant again this coming fall. The grant is based on a percentage of the community’s annual income.

According to Buffkin, the median household income in the target area is $21,809. The water rate is $20 for the first 2,000 gallons per month and $6.50 for each additional 1,000 gallons a month. Sewer, which is operated by the Yadkin Valley Sewer Authority, not the town, is $20 for the first 2,000 gallons per month and $9 for each additional 1,000 gallons. In total, 5,000 gallons of water would equal $39.50 and 5,000 gallons of sewer would be $47 for a bill of $86.50 a month.

“The combined water and sewer rate comprises 4.67 percentage of the median household income per month,” said Buffkin. “Last year that income went up just under 5 percent. The year before that it was a little more than 10 percent. Most years have seen a small increase in the costs and the increases these last couple years have been due to debt service for the loan payment we’ve had to make yearly for the money borrowed for the new water treatment plant. I’ve been here eight years and there have been price increases for half of those years.”

This coming fall will be the fourth time the town of Jonesville will apply for the grant having failed to obtain it three times in six years. Buffkin hopes the use of an asset management plan will give their application an extra boost this year.

“It’s a decision by the folks who allocate the money. I felt like each time we’ve gone for the grant we had a strong application, but for whatever reason it wasn’t strong enough,” said Buffkin. “This time we’re performing an asset management plan which would give us extra points on the application. We will have an engineering firm do a full assessment of our system to figure out what parts need to be replaced the soonest.

“The state likes to see this type of information in writing. We’re hoping to get it done this summer. We’ll have to budget some money just to do the engineering study. Grants are due in October so to get those extra points well have to have the engineering work done before then.”

Troy Brooks may be reached at 336-258-4058.

Town applying for funds to replace water lines

By Troy Brooks

[email protected]

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Church calendar

First Posted: 2:45 am - May 20th, 2016 Updated: 2:45 am - May 20th, 2016.

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May 20

• 7 p.m., Union Grove Baptist Church, 2401 Nebo Road, Yadkinville, will host the legendary Chuckwagon Gang in concert with doors opening at 6 p.m. The Boys from Enon Baptist Church will open the concert. A love offering will be received. For more information, call 336-961-5792.

May 21

• 4 to 6 p.m., Mitchell’s Chapel UMC will host a music festival featuring Cranberry Creek Blue Grass Band, Shady Grove Baptist Quartet, Rex and Donna Cranfill and others to perform. For more information, call 336-468-2045.

• 5 p.m., Mount Pleasant Baptist Church, 1432 U.S. 21, State Road, will host “Walk through the Bible,” a dramatization of many biblical events from creation through the death, burial and resurrection. A free meal of hot dogs and fixings, along with baked beans, chips, drink and dessert will be provided. Special music will be played in the fellowship hall, and golf carts will be available for those who are unable to walk.

May 22

• 11 a.m., West Elkin Baptist Church will featuring River’s Edge singing.

June 4

• 7 a.m. to 1 p.m., a multi-family yard sale will be held to benefit the Dennyville Baptist Church youth group at the Century 21 office on North Bridge Street in Elkin.

June 13-17

• Zephyr Missionary Baptist Church, Poplar Springs Road, will host its spring revival at 6 p.m. June 13 and 7 p.m. June 14-17. Guest speaker will be Don Ball, and special singing will be shared each night.

June 14

• 11:30 a.m., Sparta First Baptist Church will host senior adults fellowship.

June 23-25

• The GAP Church will host a two-night trip to Washington, D.C., with pick up at Mayberry Mall in Mount Airy on June 23, and touring sites on June 24 including Jefferson Memorial, U.S. Capitol, FDR Memorial, Martin Luther King Memorial, one-hour boat cruise, White House and more, with return on June 25. The cost of the trip is $365 per person, with the first deposit of $125 due March 1. For more information, call Kathy Dobson at 336-648-1951.

July 18-22

• 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Bannertown Baptist Church, Mount Airy, will host a children’s music camp. Cost of camp is $60 and includes a T-shirt, fun kit, morning snack and drink at lunch. For more information, call Martha Cogdill at 336-688-3105.

Ongoing

• 6 to 8 p.m., Abstract Church, 1785 N. Bridge St., Elkin, hosts Kitchen 9:13, a free community meal for everyone, each second Monday of the month.

• 5 p.m., Christ Lutheran Church has a free community meal on the fourth Monday of each month at 451 Winston Road, Jonesville.

• 7 p.m., Abstract Church, 1785 N. Bridge St., Elkin, hosts Celebrate Recovering, a ministry designed to help hurting people, each Saturday. Trained leaders provide safe, confidential, Christ-centered groups where people can seek recovery and gain healing from life’s hurts, habits and hang-ups. The group is free. For more information, visit abstractchurch.org.

Submission guidelines for calendar events: One-time events may be submitted for placement in the calendar at least two weeks prior to the date of the event. Information should include date, time, place, brief description and contact information, if necessary. Calendars are published as space permits and do not run in every issue of the paper. If your submission is not showing, it is due to the chronological order of the events. Events to be included are at our discretion, and information is subject to editing. Send events to [email protected]